Victims Rights and Support Act 2013 No 37



An Act to establish a new Victims Support Scheme to replace the compensation scheme established under the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996 and to repeal that Act; to provide for a Commissioner of Victims Rights; and to repeal and re-enact (with minor modifications) provisions of the Victims Rights Act 1996.
Part 1 Preliminary
1   Name of Act
This Act is the Victims Rights and Support Act 2013.
2   Commencement
This Act commences on the date of assent to this Act.
3   Definitions
(1)  In this Act—
agency means any of the following—
(a)  a Government agency,
(b)  a person or non-government agency funded by the State to provide support services to victims of crime.
Charter of Victims Rights means the Charter set out in section 6 and, in relation to a victim of a forensic patient, means the Charter set out in section 6A.
Commissioner means the Commissioner of Victims Rights.
conviction includes—
(a)  an order made under section 10 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999, and
(b)  except in Part 5, an order made under section 33 of the Children (Criminal Proceedings) Act 1987 (other than section 33 (1) (a) (i)).
forensic patient has the same meaning as in the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment Forensic Provisions Act 2020.
function includes a power, authority or duty and exercise a function includes perform a duty.
Fund means the Victims Support Fund.
Scheme means the Victims Support Scheme established by this Act.
Secretary means the Secretary of the Department of Justice.
support services include welfare, health, counselling and legal assistance services.
Tribunal means the Civil and Administrative Tribunal.
victim of an act of violence—see section 18.
victim of crime—see section 5.
Victims Advisory Board means the Victims Advisory Board established by this Act.
victims group means an organisation that provides support services for victims of crime.
victims support—see section 18.
Note—
The Interpretation Act 1987 contains definitions and other provisions that affect the interpretation and application of this Act.
(2)  Notes included in this Act do not form part of this Act.
s 3: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [1]; 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [1]; 2018 No 85, Sch 6 [1] [2]; 2018 No 87, Sch 1.26 [1]; 2020 No 12, Sch 3.19[1].
Part 2 Victims rights
Division 1 Preliminary
4   Object of Part
The object of this Part is to recognise and promote the rights of victims of crime.
5   Meaning of “victim of crime”
(1)  For the purposes of this Part, a victim of crime is a person who suffers harm as a direct result of an act committed, or apparently committed, by another person in the course of a criminal offence or in the course of conduct of a kind referred to in paragraph (b) of the definition of modern slavery in section 5 (1) of the Modern Slavery Act 2018.
(2)  A person suffers harm if, as a result of such an act—
(a)  the person suffers actual physical bodily harm or psychological or psychiatric harm, or
(b)  the person’s property is deliberately taken, destroyed or damaged.
(3)  If the person dies as a result of the act concerned, a member of the person’s immediate family is also a victim of crime for the purposes of this Part.
(4)  If a person dies as a result of the act concerned and there is more than one member of the person’s immediate family, members of the immediate family may nominate a representative for the purposes of the Charter of Victims Rights.
s 5: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[1].
Division 2 Charter of Victims Rights
6   Charter of rights of victims of crime
The following comprises the Charter of rights of victims of crime—
6.1   Courtesy, compassion and respect
A victim will be treated with courtesy, compassion, cultural sensitivity and respect for the victim’s rights and dignity.
6.2   Information about services and remedies
A victim will be informed at the earliest practical opportunity, by relevant agencies and officials, of the services and remedies available to the victim.
6.3   Access to services
A victim will have access where necessary to available welfare, health, counselling and legal assistance responsive to the victim’s needs.
6.4   Information about investigation of the crime
A victim will, on request, be informed of the progress of the investigation of the crime, unless the disclosure might jeopardise the investigation. In that case, the victim will be informed accordingly.
6.5   Information about prosecution of accused
(1)  A victim will be informed in a timely manner of the following—
(a)  the charges laid against the accused or the reasons for not laying charges,
(b)  any decision of the prosecution to modify or not to proceed with charges laid against the accused, including any decision to accept a plea of guilty by the accused to a less serious charge in return for a full discharge with respect to the other charges,
(c)  the date and place of hearing of any charge laid against the accused,
(d)  the outcome of the criminal proceedings against the accused (including proceedings on appeal) and the sentence (if any) imposed.
(2)  A victim will be consulted before a decision referred to in paragraph (b) above is taken if the accused has been charged with a serious crime that involves sexual violence or that results in actual bodily harm or psychological or psychiatric harm to the victim, unless—
(a)  the victim has indicated that he or she does not wish to be so consulted, or
(b)  the whereabouts of the victim cannot be ascertained after reasonable inquiry.
6.6   Information about trial process and role as witness
A victim who is a witness in the trial for the crime will be informed about the trial process and the role of the victim as a witness in the prosecution of the accused.
6.7   Protection from contact with accused
A victim will be protected from unnecessary contact with the accused and defence witnesses during the course of court proceedings.
6.8   Protection of identity of victim
A victim’s residential address and telephone number will not be disclosed unless a court otherwise directs.
6.9   Attendance at preliminary hearings
A victim will be relieved from appearing at preliminary hearings or committal hearings unless the court otherwise directs.
6.10   Return of property of victim held by State
If any property of a victim is held by the State for the purpose of investigation or evidence, the inconvenience to the victim will be minimised and the property returned promptly.
6.11   Protection from accused
A victim’s need or perceived need for protection will be put before a bail authority by the prosecutor in any bail application by the accused.
6.12   Information about special bail conditions
A victim will be informed about any special bail conditions imposed on the accused that are designed to protect the victim or the victim’s family.
6.13   Information about outcome of bail application
A victim will be informed of the outcome of a bail application if the accused has been charged with sexual assault or other serious personal violence.
6.14   Victim impact statement
A relevant victim will have access to information and assistance for the preparation of any victim impact statement authorised by law to ensure that the full effect of the crime on the victim is placed before the court.
6.15   Information about impending release, escape or eligibility for absence from custody
A victim will, on request, be kept informed of the offender’s impending release or escape from custody, or of any change in security classification that results in the offender being eligible for unescorted absence from custody.
6.16   Submissions on parole and eligibility for absence from custody of serious offenders
A victim will, on request, be provided with the opportunity to make submissions concerning the granting of parole to a serious offender or any change in security classification that would result in a serious offender being eligible for unescorted absence from custody.
6.17   Financial assistance for victims of personal violence
A victim of a crime involving sexual or other serious personal violence is entitled to make a claim under the Victims Support Scheme.
6.18   Information about complaint procedure where Charter is breached
A victim may make a complaint about a breach of the Charter and will, on request, be provided with information on the procedure for making such a complaint.
6A   Additional matters for Charter of victims rights of forensic patients
The following comprises the Charter of rights of victims of crime who are victims of forensic patients—
6A.1   General matters
Each right referred to in section 6.
6A.2   Treatment of victim
A victim will be treated with respect and compassion, having regard to the fact that proceedings may touch on painful or tragic events in the victim’s life and cause the victim to experience further grief and distress.
A victim making a submission before the Mental Health Review Tribunal should be listened to respectfully and in a way that is cognisant of the effects of the victim’s experience and the benefit of expressing views about its impact.
6A.3   Information about reviews of and other proceedings relating to forensic patients
A victim will be informed in a timely manner of any matter before the Mental Health Review Tribunal, or the release of or granting of leave to a forensic patient or any other matter, that the victim is required to be informed of under the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment Forensic Provisions Act 2020.
s 6A: Ins 2018 No 85, Sch 6 [3]. Am 2020 No 12, Sch 3.19[2].
7   Implementation of Charter
(1)  The Charter of Victims Rights is, as far as practicable and appropriate, to govern the treatment of victims in the administration of the affairs of the State.
(2)  Any agency or person exercising official functions in the administration of the affairs of the State (other than judicial functions) must, to the extent that it is relevant and practicable to do so, have regard to the Charter of Victims Rights in addition to any other relevant matter.
(3)  In this section, the administration of the affairs of the State includes the following—
(a)  the administration of justice,
(b)  the provision of police services,
(c)  the administration of any department of the Government,
(d)  the provision of services to victims of crime by any person or non-government agency funded by the State to provide those services,
(e)  the administration of matters relating to forensic patients and victims of forensic patients.
s 7: Am 2018 No 85, Sch 6 [4].
Part 3 Administration
Division 1 Commissioner of Victims Rights
8   Commissioner and other staff
(1)  A Commissioner of Victims Rights and such other staff as are necessary for the purposes of this Act are to be employed under Part 4 of the Government Sector Employment Act 2013.
(2)  The Commissioner may arrange for the use of the services of any staff or facilities of a Government agency and may, with the approval of the Secretary, engage such consultants or contractors as are necessary for the purposes of this Act.
s 8: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [2] [3].
9   Functions generally of Commissioner
(1)  The Commissioner has and may exercise such functions as are conferred or imposed on the Commissioner by or under this or any other Act.
(2)  The Commissioner may delegate the exercise of any function of the Commissioner (other than this power of delegation) to the following—
(a)  any member of staff referred to in section 8,
(b)  any person of a class prescribed by the regulations.
10   Functions of Commissioner
(1)  The Commissioner has the following functions—
(a)  to provide information to victims of crime (and members of the immediate family of missing persons) about support services and assistance for victims of crime and such persons, and to assist victims of crime in the exercise of their rights,
(b)  to co-ordinate the delivery of support services for victims of crime and members of the immediate family of missing persons and to encourage the effective and efficient delivery of those services,
(b1)  to provide funding to victims groups approved by the Commissioner,
(c)  to promote and oversee the implementation of the Charter of Victims Rights, including by publishing codes, guidelines and other practical guidance on the implementation of the Charter,
(d)  to make recommendations to assist agencies to improve their compliance with the Charter of Victims Rights, including but not limited to conducting training and recommending changes to policies and procedures,
(e)  to receive complaints from victims of crime (and members of the immediate family of missing persons) about alleged breaches of the Charter of Victims Rights and to use the Commissioner’s best endeavours to resolve the complaints,
(f)  to recommend that agencies apologise to victims of crime for breaches of the Charter of Victims Rights,
(g)  to conduct, promote and monitor training, public awareness activities and research on victims of crime,
(h)  to conduct reviews and inquiries, or both, on issues relating to victims of crime at the request of the Attorney General,
(h1)  to manage the Victims Register established under Part 8 of the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment Forensic Provisions Act 2020,
(i)  to consider, and determine, applications under this Act for victims support,
(j)  the functions conferred on the Commissioner under the Mental Health and Cognitive Impairment Forensic Provisions Act 2020.
(2)  This section does not affect the exercise of functions of the Secretary under the Government Sector Employment Act 2013 with respect to the Commissioner.
s 10: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [4]; 2018 No 85, Sch 6 [5]; 2018 No 87, Sch 1.26 [2]; 2020 No 12, Sch 3.19[3] [4].
11   Inquiries and investigations
The Commissioner may, in connection with the exercise of the functions of the Commissioner under this Act, make such inquiries and undertake such investigations as the Commissioner considers necessary.
12   Powers of Commissioner to compel production of information
(1)  The Commissioner may, by notice in writing, request that any person provide, or require any Government agency to provide, the Commissioner with information (including documents) relevant to the exercise of the Commissioner’s functions under this Act.
(2)  Any such notice may specify a day on or before which the information is required to be provided.
(3)  A person who provides the Commissioner with information that the person knows is false or misleading in a material particular is guilty of an offence.
Maximum penalty—100 penalty units, in the case of a corporation, and 50 penalty units in any other case.
(4)  If documents are given to the Commissioner under this section, the Commissioner—
(a)  may take possession of, and make copies of or take extracts from, the documents, and
(b)  may keep possession of the documents for such period as is necessary for the purposes of exercising the function concerned, and
(c)  during that period must permit the documents to be inspected at all reasonable times by the persons who would be entitled to inspect them if they were not in the possession of the Commissioner.
(5)  A Government agency is not required to provide any information under this section if there is an overriding public interest against the disclosure of the information for the purposes of the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 or if access to the information would otherwise be denied under that Act.
13   Report to Parliament
(1)  The Commissioner may, at any time, make a special report to the Minister for presentation to Parliament on any matter arising in connection with the exercise of the Commissioner’s functions, including in connection with the implementation of the Charter of Victims Rights.
(2)  Without limiting subsection (1), the Commissioner may make such a special report with respect to any breaches by an agency of the Charter of Victims Rights, if the Commissioner considers it to be appropriate to do so.
(3)  Before making the report, the Commissioner is to advise the head of the agency concerned and consult that head.
(4)  A copy of a report given to the Minister under subsection (1) is to be laid before Parliament within 14 sitting days after it is given.
(5)  The annual report of the work of the Commissioner is to be included in the annual report of the Department of Justice.
s 13: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [5].
Division 2 Victims Support Fund
14   Victims Support Fund
(1)  There is established in the Special Deposits Account a fund called the Victims Support Fund.
(2)  The Secretary has the control and management of the Fund.
(3)  The Secretary may invest money in the Fund—
(a)  if the Department of Justice is a GSF agency for the purposes of Part 6 of the Government Sector Finance Act 2018—in any way that the Department of Justice is permitted to invest money under that Part, or
(b)  if the Department of Justice is not a GSF agency for the purposes of Part 6 of the Government Sector Finance Act 2018—in any way authorised for the investment of trust funds.
s 14: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [3] [5]; 2018 No 70, Sch 3.66.
15   Payments into Fund
The following are to be paid into the Fund—
(a)  all proceeds confiscated under the Confiscation of Proceeds of Crime Act 1989,
(b)  all money required by the Criminal Assets Recovery Act 1990 to be credited to the Fund,
(c)  all money payable under Part 5 that is recovered under this Act or under the Fines Act 1996,
(c1)  all money recovered under Part 7,
(d)  all money advanced to the Fund by the Treasurer, or appropriated by Parliament, for the purposes of this Act,
(e)  all other money required by or under this or any other Act to be paid into the Fund,
(f)  all fines paid for offences under section 89 (Avoidance of liabilities).
s 15: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [1].
16   Payments from Fund
The following are to be paid from the Fund—
(a)  all payments with respect to victims support under this Act,
(b)  all expenses incurred by the Commissioner and other staff in the exercise of their functions under this Act,
(c)  all expenses incurred by the Commissioner and the Victims Advisory Board under this Act and any other expenses incurred in the provision of victims support services (including Tribunal and other administration expenses) approved by the Minister,
(c1)  any funding provided to victims groups approved by the Commissioner,
(d)  all fees to which the NSW Trustee and Guardian is entitled under section 53 of the Confiscation of Proceeds of Crime Act 1989,
(d1)  all expenses incurred by the Commissioner of Fines Administration that are payable to the Commissioner of Fines Administration under an arrangement referred to in section 16A,
(d2)  all set-off amounts that are payable to the Commissioner of Fines Administration under section 45,
(e)  all expenses incurred in the administration or management of the Fund,
(f)  all other payments required by or under this Act to be paid from the Fund.
s 16: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [2]; 2018 No 87, Sch 1.26 [3].
16A   Arrangements with Commissioner of Fines Administration
(1)  The Commissioner may enter into arrangements with the Commissioner of Fines Administration with respect to the recovery by the Commissioner of Fines Administration of amounts payable under orders for restitution within the meaning of Part 5.
(2)  Without limiting subsection (1), the arrangements may provide for the reimbursement from the Fund of expenses incurred by the Commissioner of Fines Administration in connection with the recovery of those amounts.
s 16A: Ins 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [3].
Part 4 Victims Support Scheme
Division 1 Preliminary
17   Object of Part
The object of this Part is to establish a scheme for the provision of support for victims of acts of violence and acts of modern slavery.
s 17: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[2].
18   Definitions
In this Act—
act of modern slavery—see section 19A.
act of violence—see section 19.
approved means approved by the Commissioner.
approved counselling services—see section 31.
family victim—see section 22.
financial support means the following—
(a)  financial assistance for immediate needs under section 26 (1) (b) or 29 (1) (b),
(b)  financial assistance in respect of economic loss under section 26 (1) (c), 27 or 29 (1) (d),
(c)  funeral expenses under section 29 (1) (c).
grievous bodily harm includes the destruction (other than in the course of a medical procedure) of the foetus of a pregnant woman, whether or not the woman suffers any other harm.
injury means actual bodily harm, grievous bodily harm or psychological or psychiatric harm but does not include injury arising from loss or damage to property.
primary victim—see section 20.
recognition payment—see section 34.
secondary victim—see section 21.
sexual assault and domestic violence—see section 19 (8).
victim of an act of violence means a primary victim, secondary victim or family victim of the act of violence.
victims support means support in the form of approved counselling services, financial support or a recognition payment under the Scheme.
s 18: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[2A].
19   Meaning of “act of violence”
(1)  In this Act, act of violence means an act or series of related acts, whether committed by one or more persons—
(a)  that has apparently occurred in the course of the commission of an offence, and
(b)  that has involved violent conduct against one or more persons, and
(c)  that has resulted in injury or death to one or more of those persons.
(2)  For the avoidance of doubt, the reference to an offence in subsection (1) (a) extends to conduct of a person that would constitute an offence were it not for the fact that the person cannot, or might not, be held to be criminally responsible for the conduct because of the person’s age or mental illness or impairment.
(3)  For the purposes of this section, violent conduct extends to sexual assault and domestic violence.
(4)  Except as provided by subsections (5) and (6), a series of related acts is two or more acts that are related because—
(a)  they were committed against the same person, and
(b)  in the opinion of the Tribunal or the Commissioner—
(i)  they were committed at approximately the same time, or
(ii)  they were committed over a period of time by the same person or group of persons, or
(iii)  they were, for any other reason, related to each other.
(5)  An act is not related to another act if, in the opinion of the Tribunal or the Commissioner, having regard to the particular circumstances of those acts, they ought not to be treated as related acts.
(6)  An act is not related to any earlier act in respect of which support is given under this Act if it occurs after the support is given.
(7)  For the purposes of this Act, a series of related acts, whether committed by one or more persons, constitutes a single act of violence.
(8)  In this Act—
sexual assault and domestic violence means any of the following—
(a)  sexual intercourse (within the meaning of Division 10 of Part 3 of the Crimes Act 1900) with a person without his or her consent or with consent obtained by means of a non-violent threat,
(b)  sexual intercourse (within the meaning of Division 10 of Part 3 of the Crimes Act 1900) with a child under the age of 16 years or with a person having a cognitive impairment (within the meaning of that Division),
(c)  self-manipulation (within the meaning of section 80A of the Crimes Act 1900) which a person is compelled to engage in because of a threat (within the meaning of that section),
(d)  sexual touching (within the meaning of Division 10 of Part 3 of the Crimes Act 1900) of a person without his or her consent or sexual touching of a child under the age of 16 years or the carrying out of a sexual act (within the meaning of that Division) with or towards a child under the age of 16 years,
(e)  participation with a child under the age of 18 years in an act of child prostitution (within the meaning of section 91C of the Crimes Act 1900) or the use of a child under the age of 18 years for the production of child abuse material (within the meaning of section 91FB of the Crimes Act 1900),
(f)  any other act resulting in injury that occurred in the commission of a personal violence offence (within the meaning of the Crimes (Domestic and Personal Violence) Act 2007) against any of the following persons—
(i)  a person who is or has been married to the person who committed the offence,
(ii)  a person who is or has been a de facto partner of the person who committed the offence,
(iii)  a person who has or has had an intimate personal relationship with the person who committed the offence, whether or not the intimate relationship involves or has involved a relationship of a sexual nature,
(iv)  a person who, at the time of the offence, was living in the same household as the person who committed the offence,
(v)  a person who, at the time of the offence, was living as a long-term resident in the same residential facility as the other person (not being a facility that is a correctional centre within the meaning of the Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999 or a detention centre within the meaning of the Children (Detention Centres) Act 1987),
(vi)  a person who, at the time of the offence, had a relationship involving his or her dependence on the ongoing paid or unpaid care of the person who committed the offence,
(vii)  a person who is or has been a parent, guardian or step-parent of the person who committed the offence,
(viii)  a person who is or has been a child or step-child of the person who committed the offence, or some other child of whom the person is the guardian,
(ix)  a person who is or has been a brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, step-brother or step-sister of the person who committed the offence.
s 19: Am 2018 No 33, Sch 5.15 [1]–[3].
19A   Meaning of “act of modern slavery”
(1)  In this Act, act of modern slavery means an act or series of related acts committed in New South Wales, whether committed by one or more persons—
(a)  that has apparently occurred in the course of commission of an offence or other conduct constituting modern slavery within the meaning of the Modern Slavery Act 2018, and
(b)  that has involved subjecting one or more persons to any form of slavery, servitude or forced labour of a child within the meaning of section 93AB of the Crimes Act 1900, and
(c)  that has resulted in injury or death to one of those persons.
(2)  For the avoidance of doubt, the reference to an offence in subsection (1) (a) extends to conduct of a person that would constitute an offence were it not for the fact that the person cannot, or might not, be held to be criminally responsible for the conduct because of the person’s age or mental illness or impairment.
(3)  Except as provided by subsections (4) and (5), a series of related acts is 2 or more acts that are related because—
(a)  they were committed against the same person, and
(b)  in the opinion of the Tribunal or the Commissioner—
(i)  they were committed at approximately the same time, or
(ii)  they were committed over a period of time by the same person or group of persons, or
(iii)  they were, for any other reason, related to each other.
(4)  An act is not related to another act if, in the opinion of the Tribunal or the Commissioner, having regard to the particular circumstances of those acts, they ought not to be treated as related acts.
(5)  An act is not related to any earlier act in respect of which support is given under this Act if it occurs after the support is given.
(6)  For the purposes of this Act, a series of related acts, whether committed by one or more persons, constitutes a single act of modern slavery.
s 19A: Ins 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[3].
20   Meaning of “primary victim”
(1)  A primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is a person who is injured, or dies, as a direct result of that act.
(2)  A primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery extends to a person who is injured, or dies, as a direct result of—
(a)  trying to prevent another person from committing that act, or
(b)  trying to help or rescue another person against whom that act is being committed or has just been committed, or
(c)  trying to arrest another person who is committing, or who has just committed, that act.
s 20: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[4].
21   Meaning of “secondary victim”
(1)  A secondary victim of an act of violence is a person who is injured as a direct result of witnessing the act of violence that resulted in the injury to, or death of, the primary victim of that act.
(2)  A secondary victim of an act of violence extends to a person who is injured as a direct result of subsequently becoming aware of the act of violence that resulted in the injury to, or death of, the primary victim of that act, but only if—
(a)  the person is the parent or guardian of the primary victim of that act, and
(b)  the primary victim was under the age of 18 years at the time of that act, and
(c)  the person did not commit that act.
The person is taken, for the purposes of this Act, to have witnessed the act of violence.
(3)  For the purposes of this section, a primary victim does not include a person who is a primary victim only because of the operation of section 20 (2).
22   Meaning of “family victim”
(1)  A family victim of an act of violence is a person who is, at the time that act is committed, a member of the immediate family of a primary victim of that act who has died as a direct result of that act.
(2)  It is immaterial whether or not the person suffers an injury in connection with the act of violence or death.
(3)  A member of the immediate family of a primary victim is—
(a)  the victim’s spouse, or
(b)  the victim’s de facto partner who has cohabited with the victim for at least 2 years, or
(c)  a parent, guardian or step-parent of the victim, or
(d)  a child or step-child of the victim or some other child of whom the victim is the guardian, or
(e)  a brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, step-brother or step-sister of the victim.
Note—
“De facto partner” is defined in section 21C of the Interpretation Act 1987.
Division 2 Eligibility for support
23   Eligibility for support
(1)  A primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is eligible for the support under the Scheme described in section 26.
(2)  A parent, step-parent or guardian who is caring for a child who is a primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is eligible for the support under the Scheme described in section 27.
(3)  A secondary victim of an act of violence is eligible for the support under the Scheme described in section 28.
(4)  A family victim of an act of violence is eligible for the support under the Scheme described in section 29.
s 23: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[5].
24   Death of victim
(1)  A primary victim who dies ceases to be eligible for support under the Scheme, but a family victim may then become eligible for support under the Scheme. Any pending application for support made by or on behalf of the primary victim does not survive the death of the primary victim.
(2)  A family victim who dies ceases to be eligible for victims support. Any pending application made by or on behalf of a family victim does not survive the death of the family victim.
25   Persons not eligible for support
(1) Claimants for court compensation awards A person is not eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery if the person has been paid, or is entitled to be paid, compensation awarded by a court in respect of that act under Part 6 or if the person’s application for such compensation is pending.
(2) Motor vehicle accidents A person is not eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence if that act took the form of, or the injury arose as a consequence of, a motor accident within the meaning of the Motor Accidents Compensation Act 1999.
(2A) Exception to ineligibility for motor vehicle accidents Despite subsection (2), a family victim is eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence referred to in that subsection if—
(a)  the act of violence took the form of the intentional killing of the primary victim, and
(b)  a person has been charged with murder in relation to the death of the primary victim.
(2B) Exception to ineligibility for motor vehicle accidents Despite subsection (2), a primary victim and a family victim are eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence that was a terrorist act within the meaning of the Terrorism (Police Powers) Act 2002.
(3) Offenders A person is not eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence if it occurred while the person was engaged in behaviour constituting an offence.
(4) Convicted inmates A person is not, except as provided by subsection (5), eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery if it occurred while the person was imprisoned as a convicted inmate within the meaning of the Crimes (Administration of Sentences) Act 1999 (unless the person was imprisoned only because of the person’s failure to pay a pecuniary penalty).
(5) Exception to ineligibility of convicted inmates However, any such convicted inmate may, in special circumstances, receive victims support. Any such support is not to be given unless the Commissioner is satisfied that the special circumstances of the case justify an exception being made to the general ineligibility of convicted inmates.
(6)  Without limiting subsection (5), the Commissioner may determine that special circumstances exist if the convicted inmate is seriously and permanently injured as a result of the act of violence or act of modern slavery concerned.
(7)  Regulations may be made for the purposes of this section prescribing the persons, or class of persons, who are not eligible to receive victims support in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery.
s 25: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[5A]; 2018 No 83, Sch 2 [1]; 2018 No 86, Sch 1 [1].
Division 3 Composition of support
26   Composition of support—primary victims
(1)  The support under the Scheme for which a primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is eligible comprises the following—
(a)  approved counselling services with respect to that act of violence or act of modern slavery,
(b)  financial assistance for immediate needs up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations to cover expenses for treatment or other measures that need to be taken urgently, as a direct result of that act of violence or act of modern slavery, to secure the victim’s safety, health or well being,
(c)  financial assistance of up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations for the economic loss suffered by the primary victim as a direct result of that act of violence or act of modern slavery of a kind described in the regulations,
(d)  if a recognition payment is payable under this Part in respect of the act of violence or act of modern slavery—that recognition payment.
(2)  Financial assistance for which a primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is eligible is reduced by the total amount paid or approved for payment to the victim’s parent, step-parent or guardian under section 27 in respect of that act of violence or act of modern slavery.
s 26: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[5A].
27   Composition of support—parent, step-parent or guardian of child primary victim
(1)  A parent, step-parent or guardian who is caring for a child who is the primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery is eligible for financial assistance of up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations for the economic loss arising as a direct result of that act of violence or act of modern slavery of a kind described in the regulations.
(2)  Financial assistance for which a parent, step-parent or guardian is eligible under this section is reduced by the total amount paid or approved for payment to the primary victim under section 26 (1) (c) in respect of that act of violence or act of modern slavery.
s 27: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[5A].
28   Composition of support—secondary victims
The support under the Scheme for which a secondary victim of an act of violence is eligible comprises approved counselling services with respect to the act of violence.
29   Composition of support—family victims
(1)  The support under the Scheme for which a family victim of an act of violence is eligible comprises the following—
(a)  approved counselling services,
(b)  financial assistance for immediate needs up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations to cover expenses of measures that need to be taken urgently, as a direct result of that act of violence, to secure the victim’s safety, health or well being (less any amount payable under section 47),
(c)  a payment of up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations for funeral expenses actually incurred, or reasonably likely to be incurred, by the family victim for the funeral of the primary victim who died as a result of that act of violence (less any amount payable under section 47),
(d)  financial assistance of up to a maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations for economic loss suffered by the family victim as a direct result of that act of violence of a kind described in the regulations.
(2)  If more than one family victim is eligible for a payment under subsection (1) (c) in relation to the same act of violence, the total amount that may be granted for funeral expenses to all such family victims is the maximum amount prescribed by the regulations, less any amount payable under section 47.
Note—
Section 47 provides for direct reimbursement of funeral expenses to persons other than family victims.
(3)  In addition, if a recognition payment is payable under this Part in respect of the relevant act of violence, each family member who is a parent, step-parent or guardian or a dependent family member is eligible to be given that recognition payment.
(4)  A family victim is a dependent family member for the purposes of this section if—
(a)  the person was financially dependent on the primary victim at the relevant time, or
(b)  the person is a child of the primary victim born after the death of the victim where, had the child been born in the victim’s lifetime, the child would have been a financially dependent family member of the victim by virtue of paragraph (a).
30   Financial assistance
(1)  Financial assistance under this Part may take the form of a grant, allowance, refund of expenditure, direct payment of an invoice, or any other form of financial assistance that the Commissioner may approve generally, or in a particular case or class of cases.
(2)  Financial assistance is not payable to a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery or the parent, step-parent or guardian of a victim, to the extent that the victim, parent, step-parent or guardian has received, or is entitled to receive, payment for that loss arising from that act of violence or act of modern slavery under any insurance or agreement or arrangement under any other Act or law.
(3)  The regulations may make provision for or with respect to any of the following—
(a)  the particular kinds of expenses for immediate needs or economic loss for which a person may or may not be given financial assistance under this Part,
(b)  the maximum amount that a person may be given under this Part in respect of a particular kind of expense for immediate needs or for economic loss,
(c)  the circumstances in which a person may be given financial assistance,
(d)  the maximum amount that a person may be given under this Part in respect of a particular kind of economic loss.
s 30: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[6].
30A   Victims support where act is both act of violence and modern slavery
To avoid doubt, if an act is both an act of violence and an act of modern slavery a victim is eligible once for support under the Scheme in relation to the act.
s 30A: Ins 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[6A].
Division 4 Approved counselling services
31   Approved counselling services
(1)  The Commissioner may—
(a)  approve professional counsellors who may provide approved counselling services for the purposes of this Act, or
(b)  in the case of counselling services to be provided to a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery who is resident outside Australia—give approval for the victim to select a professional counsellor of the victim’s choice to provide the victim with approved counselling services for the purposes of this Act.
(2)  The Commissioner may—
(a)  suspend or revoke an approval, and
(b)  make an approval subject to conditions, and
(c)  vary or revoke any condition of an approval or impose additional conditions on an approval.
s 31: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[7].
32   Authorisation of payments for approved counselling services
(1)  The regulations may make provision for or with respect to the authorisation of payments for or in relation to approved counselling services provided to victims of acts of violence or acts of modern slavery (whether resident in Australia or elsewhere), including the application (with or without modification) of the provisions of this Act relating to financial support or recognition payments.
(2)  The regulations may make provision for or with respect to the provision of approved counselling services, and authorisation of payments for such services, to persons who are relatives of primary victims who have died as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery, but who are not family victims within the meaning of this Act.
s 32: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[8] [9].
33   Amount of payments
(1)  Payment for or in relation to approved counselling services under this Act may take the form of a grant, allowance, refund of expenditure, direct payment of an invoice, or any other form of payment that the Commissioner may approve generally, or in a particular case or class of cases.
(2)  The amount of the payment for approved counselling services is the amount, or amount determined in the manner, prescribed by the regulations.
Division 5 Recognition payments
34   Definitions
In this Division—
category of recognition payment means a category of recognition payment described in section 35.
recognition payment means a payment made in recognition of the trauma suffered by a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery.
series of related acts has the same meaning as in section 19 (4).
sexual assault has the meaning it has in paragraph (a), (b), (c) or (e) of the definition of sexual assault and domestic violence in section 19 (8).
sexual touching or sexual act means sexual touching (within the meaning of Division 10 of Part 3 of the Crimes Act 1900) of a person without his or her consent or sexual touching of a child under the age of 16 years or the carrying out of a sexual act (within the meaning of that Division) with or towards a child under the age of 16 years.
s 34: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[9A]; 2018 No 33, Sch 5.15 [4].
35   Categories of recognition payment
(1)  A category A recognition payment is a payment given in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery that apparently occurred in the course of the commission of a homicide.
(2)  A category B recognition payment is a payment given in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery of the following kinds—
(a)  a sexual assault resulting in serious bodily injury or which involved an offensive weapon or was carried out by 2 or more persons,
(b)  a sexual assault, sexual touching or sexual act or attempted sexual assault involving violence that is one of a series of related acts.
(3)  A category C recognition payment is a payment given in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery involving any of the following—
(a)  a sexual assault other than one referred to in subsection (2) (b),
(b)  an attempted sexual assault resulting in serious bodily injury,
(c)  an assault resulting in grievous bodily harm,
(d)  physical assault of a child that is one of a series of related acts.
(4)  A category D recognition payment is a payment given in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery involving any of the following—
(a)  sexual touching or sexual act,
(b)  an attempted sexual assault involving violence other than one referred to in subsection (3) (b),
(c)  a robbery involving violence,
(d)  an assault (not resulting in grievous bodily harm).
s 35: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[9A]; 2018 No 33, Sch 5.15 [5] [6].
36   Recognition payments
(1)  Recognition payments are payable as follows—
(a)  a category A recognition payment of an amount prescribed by the regulations is payable—
(i)  to each family victim (other than a child referred to in subparagraph (ii)) who, immediately before the death of a primary victim as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (1), was financially dependent on the primary victim, and
(ii)  to each child of a primary victim who, immediately before the death of the primary victim as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (1), was under the age of 18 years,
(b)  a category A recognition payment of an amount prescribed by the regulations is payable to the following who were not, immediately before the death of the primary victim concerned, financially dependent on a primary victim who died as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (1)—
(i)  a parent, step-parent or guardian of the primary victim,
(ii)  any person who, immediately before the death of the primary victim, was the victim’s spouse or de facto partner as referred to in section 22 (3) (b),
(c)  a category B recognition payment of an amount prescribed by the regulations is payable to a primary victim who suffered injury as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (2),
(d)  a category C recognition payment of an amount prescribed by the regulations is payable to a primary victim who suffered injury as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (3),
(e)  a category D recognition payment of an amount prescribed by the regulations is payable to a primary victim who suffered injury as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery described in section 35 (4).
(2)  Only one recognition payment is payable to a single victim in respect of a series of related acts of violence or acts of modern slavery against the victim.
s 36: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[9A] [9B]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [1].
37   Regulations
The regulations may make provision for or with respect to—
(a)  the kind of acts of violence or acts of modern slavery in respect of which a particular category of recognition payment may be made under this Division, or
(b)  the circumstances in which a recognition payment is payable under this Division.
s 37: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[9B].
Division 6 Applications for victims support
38   Applications for victims support
(1)  An application for victims support may be made by the following—
(a)  a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery,
(b)  a parent, step-parent or guardian of a primary victim who is a child,
(c)  any other person, on behalf of a victim, who has a genuine interest in the welfare of that victim.
(2)  The application is to be made to the Commissioner in the approved form, which is to be supplied by the Commissioner free of charge.
s 38: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[10].
39   Documentary evidence
(1)  An application for victims support is to be accompanied by such documentary evidence as may be required by the approved form.
(2)  Without limiting subsection (1), the documentary evidence to be required—
(a)  for an application for financial assistance for immediate needs under section 26—is documentary evidence (such as a medical or police report or a report by an agency that provides support services to victims of crime) sufficient to support, on the balance of probability, the applicant’s claim to be a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery, and
(b)  for an application for financial assistance for economic loss under section 26 or 27 or for a recognition payment—is—
(i)  a police report, or a report by a Government agency or any other agency that provides support services to victims of crime, sufficient to support, on the balance of probability, the applicant’s claim to be a victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery, and
(ii)  a medical, dental or counselling report verifying that the applicant or child who is the primary victim concerned has actually been injured as a result of an act of violence or act of modern slavery.
(3)  An application for financial assistance under section 26 (1) (c), 27 or 29 is to give full particulars of any economic loss for which the assistance is sought.
(4)  The application is to include—
(a)  in the case of actual expenses—receipts, invoices or other approved forms of substantiation of the expenditure incurred or to be incurred, or
(b)  in the case of actual loss of earnings—the name and address of the employer, the period of absence from work and a statement from the employer substantiating those particulars.
(5)  In this section—
agency includes a non-government agency funded by the Commonwealth to provide support services to victims of crime.
s 39: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[11]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [2] [3]; 2018 No 83, Sch 2 [2].
40   Time for making, and duration of, applications
(1)  Except as provided by this section, an application for financial support or a recognition payment must be duly made within 2 years after the relevant act of violence occurred or, if the victim was a child when the act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred, within 2 years after the day on which the child concerned turns 18 years of age.
(2)  An application for financial support or a recognition payment may be made by a family victim more than 2 years after the relevant act of violence that resulted in the death of the primary victim occurred if it was only established (whether or not by a court) that the primary victim died as a direct result of the relevant act of violence subsequently to the occurrence.
(3)  In the circumstances described in subsection (2), an application for financial support or a recognition payment may be duly made within 2 years after it is established that the primary victim died as a direct result of the relevant act of violence.
(4)    (Repealed)
(5)  An application for a recognition payment in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery involving domestic violence, child abuse or sexual assault must be duly made within 10 years after the relevant act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred or, if the victim was a child when the act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred, within 10 years after the day on which the child concerned turns 18 years of age.
(6)  Claims may continue to be made under an application that is duly made in respect of an act of violence or act of modern slavery until whichever of the following first occurs—
(a)  the expiration of the period of 5 years after the application is made,
(b)  the total maximum amount of financial support that the victim is eligible to receive under this Act in respect of that act of violence or act of modern slavery has been given.
(7)  This section (other than subsection (6)) does not apply to an application for financial support, being for financial assistance of a kind specified in clause 8 (2) (b) or (d) of the Victims Rights and Support Regulation 2013, or a recognition payment for a person who is a primary victim of an act of violence that occurs in the course of the commission of a sexual offence against the person when the person is under 18 years of age. There is no time limit on when such an application can be made.
s 40: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[9A] [12]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [4]–[6].
41   Withdrawal of application
(1)  An applicant for victims support may withdraw his or her application at any time before the application is determined by written notice to the Commissioner.
(2)  The withdrawal of an application for victims support under this section does not prevent the applicant from making another application for support.
41A   Lapsing of application if evidence to support application not provided
(1)  An application for victims support lapses if—
(a)  12 months has passed since the applicant was first requested to provide evidence to support the application, and
(b)  the applicant has, during that 12-month period, been requested on at least 3 separate occasions to provide that evidence, and
(c)  the Commissioner decides that the applicant does not have a valid reason for failing to provide that evidence.
(2)  Subsection (1) applies regardless of whether any claim under the application has been determined.
(3)  The Commissioner is to notify the applicant that the application has lapsed under this section.
(4)  The lapsing of an application for victims support under this section does not prevent the applicant from making another application for victims support.
s 41A: Ins 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [7].
42   Consideration of applications
(1)  Each duly made application for victims support is to be considered by the Commissioner.
(2)  The Secretary or any other Public Service employee may not direct, overrule or interfere with a determination of the Commissioner with respect to an application for victims support.
s 42: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [3] [6].
43   Determination of applications
(1)  After considering an application for victims support, the Commissioner must determine the application—
(a)  by approving the giving of the victims support, or
(b)  by dismissing the application.
(2)  The Commissioner may defer the determination of the application if the Commissioner is of the opinion that there are relevant matters requiring further consideration or clarification.
Note—
Section 11 enables the Commissioner to carry out inquiries and investigations with respect to applications.
(3)  The Commissioner must not approve the giving of victims support unless satisfied that the person to whom the application relates—
(a)  is a primary victim, secondary victim or family victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery or is a parent, step-parent or guardian who is caring for a child who is a primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery, and
(b)  is eligible to receive the victims support concerned.
(4)  Written notice is to be given to the applicant of the determination of the application.
(5)  If approval is given, the notice must include a statement of the amount (if any) payable by way of financial support (including whether for immediate needs or economic loss, or both) or by way of recognition payment, together with a statement of the reasons for approving the giving of those amounts.
(6)  If the application is dismissed, the notice must include a statement of the reasons for the dismissal.
(7)  The Commissioner may, only on the Commissioner’s own initiative, amend a notice given under this section to correct an error in the notice.
s 43: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[13]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [8].
44   Reasons for not approving the giving of victims support or for reducing amount of financial support or recognition payment
(1)  In determining whether or not to approve the giving of victims support, and in determining the amount of financial support to be given or recognition payment to be made, the Commissioner must have regard to the following—
(a)  any behaviour (including past criminal activity), attitude or disposition of the primary victim concerned that directly or indirectly contributed to the injury or death sustained by the victim,
(b), (c)    (Repealed)
(d)  whether the victim participated in the commission of the act of violence or act of modern slavery, encouraged another person to commit the act of violence or act of modern slavery or otherwise gave assistance to any person by whom the act of violence or act of modern slavery was committed,
(e)  whether the victim has failed to provide reasonable assistance to any person or body duly engaged in the investigation of the act of violence or act of modern slavery or in the arrest or prosecution of any person by whom the act of violence or act of modern slavery was committed or alleged to have been committed,
(f)  whether the victim failed to take reasonable steps to mitigate the extent of the injury sustained by the victim, such as seeking appropriate medical advice or treatment, as soon as practicable after the act of violence or act of modern slavery was committed,
(g)  such other matters as the Commissioner considers relevant.
(2)    (Repealed)
(3)  In determining the matter referred to in subsection (1) (f) in the case of an act of violence or act of modern slavery involving sexual assault or domestic violence, the Commissioner must have regard to the nature of the relationship between the victim and the person or persons by whom the act of violence or act of modern slavery is alleged to have been committed.
(3A)  In determining a matter referred to in subsection (1) or (2) in the case of an act of modern slavery, the Commissioner must have regard to the nature of the relationship between the victim and the person or persons by whom the act of modern slavery is alleged to have been committed.
(4)  In determining the amount of financial support to be given or the recognition payment to be made to a person, the Commissioner must have regard to—
(a)  any amount that has been paid to the person or that the person is entitled to be paid—
(i)  by way of damages awarded in civil proceedings, or
(ii)  under any other Act or law (including workers compensation), or
(iii)  under any insurance or other agreement or arrangement, and
(b)  any other amount that has been received by the person or that (in the opinion of the Commissioner) is likely to be received by the person,
in respect of the act of violence or act of modern slavery to which the application for financial support or a recognition payment relates.
(5)  If the Commissioner is satisfied that the applicant may be entitled to workers compensation (or payment in the nature of workers compensation) in respect of the act of violence or act of modern slavery to which the application relates, the Commissioner is to postpone the determination of the application until any entitlements to workers compensation have been determined.
(6)  If the Commissioner is satisfied that the applicant may be entitled to death and disability payments under Part 9B of the Police Act 1990 in respect of the act of violence or act of modern slavery to which the application relates, the Commissioner is to postpone the determination of the application until any entitlements to those payments have been determined.
(6A)  If the Commissioner is satisfied that an applicant for victims support, who is a family victim referred to in section 25 (2A), may be entitled to any damages under the Compensation to Relatives Act 1897, or any payment under the Motor Accident Injuries Act 2017, in respect of the act of violence or act of modern slavery to which the application relates, the Commissioner is to postpone the determination of the application until any entitlement to those damages or to that payment (as the case may be) has been determined.
(7)  The Commissioner may postpone the determination of a person’s application pending the determination of another application for financial support or a recognition payment if the person has been convicted of an offence that is a relevant offence under section 58 in relation to that other application.
s 44: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[14] [15]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [9] [10]; 2018 No 86, Sch 1 [2].
45   Payments may be applied towards liability for restitution under Part 5
(1)  If financial support or a recognition payment is payable to a person who is also liable for payment of a restitution amount, the Commissioner may authorise the amount payable, or any part of that amount, to be applied towards discharging the person’s liability for the restitution amount.
(2)  Any amount that the Commissioner authorises to be applied towards discharging the person’s liability for a restitution amount is a set-off amount.
(3)  When a set-off amount is applied towards discharging a person’s liability for a restitution amount, the person is taken to have been paid financial support or a recognition payment to the extent of the set-off amount.
(4)  If the restitution amount has been referred to the Commissioner of Fines Administration for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996, the set-off amount—
(a)  is to be paid to the Commissioner of Fines Administration, and
(b)  is taken to be an amount recovered from the person under a court fine enforcement order made under that Act.
Note—
Section 112K of the Fines Act 1996 provides that amounts recovered under the court fine enforcement order are to be applied firstly towards enforcement costs payable under the order and secondly towards payment of the restitution amount.
(5)  If the restitution amount has not been referred to the Commissioner of Fines Administration for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996, the person is taken to have paid the restitution amount to the extent of the set-off amount.
(6)  In this section—
restitution amount means an amount payable under a confirmed order within the meaning of Part 5.
s 45: Subst 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [4].
46   Persons to whom financial support or recognition payment may be made
(1)  The financial support or recognition payment approved by the Commissioner under section 43 may be made payable—
(a)  to the person to whom the application for such victims support relates, or
(b)  to any other person for the benefit of that person.
(2)  In making a decision as to whom the victims support should be made payable, the Commissioner must have regard to the likelihood that a person by whom an act of violence or act of modern slavery was allegedly committed may receive the benefit of the victims support or any part of it.
(3)    (Repealed)
s 46: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[15A]; 2020 No 31, Sch 2.7[1].
47   Reimbursement of persons who incur funeral and certain other expenses
(1)  This section applies if the following expenses have been incurred by a person who is not eligible for support in the form of financial assistance for immediate needs or payment of funeral expenses under section 29 as a family victim—
(a)  expenses relating to the funeral of a primary victim of an act of violence,
(b)  expenses associated with cleaning up damage caused to premises and property as a direct result of an act of violence.
(2)  The person may apply to the Commissioner for payment of the amount of the reasonable expenses incurred by the person.
(3)  The Commissioner may approve payment to the person of an amount not exceeding the maximum amount in total prescribed by the regulations and that the Commissioner considers to be fair and reasonable.
(4)  Any such payment—
(a)  is to be paid from the amount of financial assistance for immediate needs or payment of funeral expenses for which the family victims are eligible under section 29, and
(b)  is taken to be an approval for the giving of such financial assistance despite section 29.
(5)  Accordingly, and despite section 29, the amount payable to the family victims concerned may be reduced if an application for payment of reasonable expenses is approved by the Commissioner under this section.
48   Victims support may be approved subject to conditions
(1)  Approval for the giving of financial support or making of a recognition payment may be given by the Commissioner subject to any of the following conditions—
(a)  notification to the Commissioner of such matters (including matters relating to the financial circumstances of the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given) as may be specified in the notice of determination relating to the approval,
(b)  assignment by the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given of that person’s right to any entitlement that the person has by way of damages awarded in civil proceedings,
(c)  repayment of the whole or any part of the amount of the financial support or recognition payment under such circumstances as may be specified in the notice of determination relating to the approval,
(d)  in the case of victims support that is payable to a person for the benefit of some other person—
(i)  as to the payment of the money received under the approval to or for the benefit of that other person, or
(ii)  as to the holding of the whole or any part of that money on trust for that other person.
(2)  An approval of victims support is subject to the following conditions—
(a)  the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given (other than a family victim) must notify the Commissioner of any money received in the future from other sources in connection with the injuries, expenses and losses taken into account in giving the approval,
(b)  the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given (other than a family victim) must repay from the amount approved any such future amounts referred to in paragraph (a) on demand by the Commissioner,
(c)  the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given must repay to the Commissioner the amount approved if it is subsequently ascertained that the approval was obtained by fraud or collusion,
(d)  the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given (if a primary victim of an act of violence or act of modern slavery) is to provide reasonable assistance to any person or body engaged in the official investigation of the act of violence or act of modern slavery.
(2A)  An approval of victims support is also subject to the condition that the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given must notify the Commissioner of any amount that the person has already received from other sources in connection with the act of violence to which the victims support relates.
(2B)  Payment under section 54 of the whole or any part of victims support may be withheld by the Commissioner if the person to or for whose benefit the approval is given fails to comply with subsection (2A).
(3)  The regulations may prescribe other conditions to which an approval of victims support is subject.
(4)  An amount that is required to be repaid in accordance with the conditions to which an approval of victims support is subject and that is not repaid may be recovered by the Commissioner as if it were a debt due to the Commissioner.
s 48: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[16]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [11].
Division 7 Review of decisions concerning victims support
49   Internal review of victims support decisions
(1)  An applicant for victims support may apply to the Commissioner for an internal review of the decision made by a person to whom the Commissioner has delegated the Commissioner’s functions with respect to an application for victims support (in this Division called the decision maker).
(2)  The application must be made within 90 days after the day on which the applicant is given notice of the decision maker’s decision.
(3)  An application for an internal review must be in writing and state fully the grounds of the application.
(4)  An internal review is to be done by making a new decision, as if the decision being reviewed (the original decision) had not been made, with the new decision being made as if it were being made when the application for support to which the review relates was originally received.
(5)  Within 42 days after the application for the internal review is lodged (or such other period as the Commissioner and the applicant agree on), the Commissioner must notify the applicant in writing of—
(a)  the outcome of the internal review, and
(b)  the reasons for the decision in the internal review, and
(c)  the right of the person to have a decision with respect to a recognition payment administratively reviewed by the Tribunal under section 51.
s 49: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [2]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [12].
50   No internal review under Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997
(1)  The procedure for internal review of a decision provided for by this Part applies to the exclusion of section 53 (Internal reviews) of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 in the case of a decision with respect to a recognition payment.
(2)  A reference in the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 to internal review of an administratively reviewable decision under that Act is, in its application to a decision with respect to a recognition payment under this Part, to be read as a reference to internal review of the decision under this Part.
s 50: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [3] [4].
51   Application to Tribunal for administrative review of decision concerning recognition payment
(1)  An applicant for a recognition payment who is aggrieved by the decision of a decision maker in respect of the application may apply to the Tribunal for an administrative review under the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 of a decision made by the Commissioner following an internal review under section 49 of the decision maker’s decision with respect to the recognition payment.
(2)  An applicant for a recognition payment who is aggrieved by the decision of the Commissioner in respect of the application may apply to the Tribunal for an administrative review under the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 of a decision made by the Commissioner.
s 51: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [5].
52   Operation of other Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 provisions
(1)  The provisions of Division 2 (Effect of pending applications on administratively reviewable decisions) of Part 3 of Chapter 3 of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 do not apply to an application to the Tribunal for review under this Division.
(2)    (Repealed)
s 52: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [6] [7].
53   Payment of recognition payment suspended pending application to Tribunal
Subject to any order of the Tribunal to the contrary, an application to the Tribunal for an administrative review of a decision concerning a recognition payment suspends the application of section 16 in relation to the payment pending the determination of the review by the Tribunal.
s 53: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [8].
Division 8 Victims support payments
54   Victims Support Fund to pay victims support
(1)  A claim for payment of the whole or any part of victims support for which approval is given by the Commissioner under section 43 is to be made to the Commissioner.
(2)  On receiving the application for payment, the Commissioner must (subject to the conditions of the approval and any deductions made in accordance with those conditions) pay the relevant amount to the person to whom it is payable.
(3)  The amount is to be paid out of the Fund or, if sufficient money is not available in that Fund, out of the Consolidated Fund which is, to the extent necessary, appropriated accordingly.
55   Effect of approval on subsequent civil proceedings
(1)  This section applies to civil proceedings commenced or maintained in respect of an injury or loss sustained by a person to whom the giving of victims support has been approved under this Part on the basis of the same facts as those on which the civil proceedings are based.
(2)  Subject to subsection (3), approval of the giving of victims support does not affect a person’s right to commence or maintain civil proceedings, and damages in civil proceedings must be assessed without regard to the approval.
(3)  On the payment to a person of approved victims support, the person’s right to commence or maintain civil proceedings against any other person in respect of the same facts as those on which the approval is based is, by operation of this section, subrogated to the State to the extent of the amount of support so paid.
(4)  This section does not limit the operation of section 74 or 102.
56   Recovery from fraudulent claimants
(1)  The Tribunal may, on application by the Commissioner, make an order for restitution for such amount as has been paid to a person as victims support if the person is convicted of—
(a)  an offence of obtaining approval for the giving of victims support by means of fraud or false pretence or by means of a wilfully false or wilfully misleading statement, or
(b)  an offence, in relation to the obtaining of such approval, of a kind prescribed by the regulations.
(2)  An order for restitution may not be made if 2 years or more have elapsed since the date on which the person was convicted of the relevant offence.
(3)  The provisions of Part 5 relating to the recovery of money under an order for restitution and Part 7A of the Fines Act 1996 apply to an order for restitution under this section (with any modifications prescribed by the regulations).
s 56: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [5].
Part 5 Recovery of victims support payments from offenders
Division 1 Preliminary
57   Object of Part
The object of this Part is to enable financial support paid and recognition payments made under the Scheme to be recovered from persons found guilty of the crimes giving rise to the payments.
58   Definitions
In this Part—
confirmed order means an order for restitution that is confirmed by the Commissioner or the Tribunal under section 63, 64 or 67.
debt notice—see section 70B.
defendant means the person on whom an order for restitution is served.
Fines Commissioner means the Commissioner of Fines Administration under the Fines Act 1996.
objection means an objection by the defendant under section 62 to an order for restitution.
order for restitution means an order for restitution that is made by the Commissioner under section 59 or 60.
relevant offence means any of the following—
(a)  an offence in respect of which an act of violence or act of modern slavery (whether or not a series of related acts) is found to have been committed,
(b)  an offence for or in respect of which victims support is given under this Act,
(c)  any other offence if an offence referred to in paragraph (a) or (b) was taken into account (under Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999) when sentence was passed on the offender for that other offence.
review proceedings means proceedings of the Tribunal concerning an order for restitution.
victim means a person to whom an amount has been paid under an approval for the giving of financial support or the making of a recognition payment under Part 4.
s 58: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [6]; 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[17]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [13].
Division 2 Restitution by offenders
59   Commissioner’s discretion to make provisional order for restitution by offender
(1)  If the Commissioner is of the opinion that, before or after an approval for the giving of financial support or making of a recognition payment is given, a person has been convicted of a relevant offence, the Commissioner may make an order for restitution against the person.
(2)  An order may not be made against a person if—
(a)  2 years or more have elapsed since—
(i)  the end of the period in which a claim may be made under an application for victims support under section 40 (6), or
(ii)  the date on which the person was convicted of the relevant offence,
whichever is the later, or
(b)  civil proceedings have been commenced or are being maintained against the person, by or on behalf of the State, in respect of an action for damages arising from substantially the same facts as those on which the relevant approval was based.
s 59: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [7] [8].
60   Commissioner’s discretion to make order for restitution by other person
(1)  If the Commissioner is of the opinion that a person against whom an order for restitution has been made under section 59 has disposed of property as part of a scheme for the purpose of avoiding a liability (whether actual or potential) under this Division, the Commissioner may make an order for restitution against any person—
(a)  who was a party to the scheme, and
(b)  who obtained property under the scheme without giving sufficient consideration.
(2)  An order may be made against a person under this section whether or not the person has retained the property concerned.
(3)  An order may not be made under this section if 2 years or more have elapsed since the order for restitution on which it is based was made.
(4)  An order may not be made under this section (and any such order that has been made ceases to be in force) if the order on which it is based is not confirmed by the Commissioner or the Tribunal or is set aside or ceases to be in force.
(5)  The total amount that may be recovered under an order under this section and under the order under section 59 on which it is based is not to exceed the amount payable under the order under section 59.
s 60: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [8]–[11].
61   Notification of decision
(1)  The Commissioner must serve notice of an order for restitution personally or by post on the person against whom it was made.
(2)  The notice must—
(a)  set out the terms of the order, and
(b)  include a statement of the grounds on which the order was made, and
(c)  set out the effect of sections 63 and 64, and
(d)  set out an explanation of—
(i)  the right to object, within 28 days after the notice is served, to the order and the procedure for objecting, and
(ii)  the effect of objecting or failing to object.
s 61: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [12] [13].
62   Objection to order
(1)  A person served with notice of an order for restitution may lodge a written objection to the order with the Commissioner.
(2)  The objection must be lodged within 28 days (or such longer period, not exceeding 90 days, as the Commissioner may allow) after the notice was served.
(3)  The grounds for the objection must be stated fully and in detail in the objection.
(4)  On an objection, the defendant has the onus of proving the defendant’s case.
s 62: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [14].
63   Confirmation by Commissioner of order if no objection
(1)  The Commissioner may confirm an order for restitution without conducting a hearing if—
(a)  the Commissioner is satisfied that the person has not lodged an objection within 28 days after notice of the order was served on the person, or
(b)  the person agrees to the confirmation of the order and seeks time to pay the amount payable under the order under the Fines Act 1996.
(1A)  A person cannot object to the making of the order if the person agrees to its confirmation and seeks a time to pay order under the Fines Act 1996, and the Fines Commissioner decides to make the time to pay order sought by the person.
(2)  Before confirming such an order, the Commissioner may vary the order by reducing the amount payable under it.
(3)    (Repealed)
s 63: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [7] [15] [16].
64   Powers of Commissioner on objection
(1)  After considering an objection, the Commissioner may—
(a)  allow the objection in whole or in part or disallow the objection, and
(b)  confirm the decision to which the objection was made (with or without variations) or reverse that decision.
(2)  The Commissioner may confirm the order for restitution if the Commissioner confirms the decision to which the objection was made (with or without variations).
(2A)  Before confirming the order, the Commissioner may vary the order by reducing the amount payable under it.
(3)  The Commissioner must revoke the order for restitution if the Commissioner reverses the original decision.
(4)  For the purpose of enabling a defendant to apply to the Tribunal for an administrative review, the Commissioner is taken to have failed to determine an objection if 90 days have passed since the objection was lodged with the Commissioner.
(5)  The Commissioner’s failure to determine an objection within the period referred to in subsection (4) does not prevent the Commissioner from continuing to deal with the objection after that period has expired.
(6)  In calculating a period referred to in subsection (4), the period between the date on which the Commissioner requests further information or supporting evidence from the defendant in relation to the objection and the date on which that further information or supporting evidence is furnished is excluded.
s 64: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [9]; 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [17]–[19].
65   Notice of determination of objection
(1)  The Commissioner must give a defendant who makes an objection written notice of the determination of the objection.
(2)  The Commissioner must, in the notice, give the reasons for disallowing the objection or for allowing the objection in part only.
(3)  The reasons for a determination of an objection must set out the matters referred to in section 49 (3) of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 in respect of the determination.
(4)  The notice must also inform the defendant of the defendant’s right to make an application for an administrative review under section 66 in the case of a determination to disallow the objection or to allow the objection in part only.
s 65: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [10] [11].
66   Administrative reviews by Tribunal
(1)  The defendant may apply to the Tribunal for an administrative review under the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 of the decision (the original decision) to which an objection was made if—
(a)  the defendant is dissatisfied with the Commissioner’s determination of the objection, or
(b)  90 days have passed as referred to in section 64 since the objection was lodged with the Commissioner and the Commissioner has not determined the objection.
(2)  The applicant’s and respondent’s cases on an application for an administrative review are not limited to the grounds of the objection.
(3)  The applicant has the onus of proving the applicant’s case in an application for an administrative review.
(4)  An application for an administrative review—
(a)  following a determination by the Commissioner of an objection—must be made not later than 60 days after the date of issue of the notice of the Commissioner’s determination of the objection, or
(b)  following a failure of the Commissioner to determine an objection within the relevant 90-day period—may be made at any time after the end of that period (but must be made as required by paragraph (a) following a subsequent determination of the objection by the Commissioner).
(5)  The Tribunal may extend the time for making an application for an administrative review.
(6)  The following provisions of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 do not apply to an application made under this section—
(a)  Part 2 of Chapter 3,
(b)  section 55 (3)–(6),
(c)  Division 2 of Part 3 of Chapter 3.
(7)  For the purposes of section 58 (1) (a) of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997
(a)  the obligation of the Commissioner under that paragraph to lodge a statement of reasons with the Tribunal in respect of an application is limited to providing the Tribunal with a statement of reasons only in respect of the matters arising from the grounds specified in the application, and
(b)  if one of the grounds specified in the application relates to a matter raised in an objection determined by the Commissioner—the Commissioner may rely on reasons previously given to the defendant by the Commissioner under this Act for the determination of the objection in explanation of that part of the original decision.
(8)  In any review proceedings, a person who is a victim of the relevant offence to which the proceedings relate is competent, but not compellable, to give evidence or produce documents.
Note—
See also section 113 which provides that an application for victims support and any documents supporting the application are, subject to that section, not admissible as evidence in any legal proceedings.
s 66: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [12]–[15]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [14].
67   Powers of Tribunal on administrative review
(1)  On an administrative review, the Tribunal may—
(a)  confirm the original decision the subject of review (with or without variations) or reverse that decision, and
(b)  make any other orders it thinks fit.
(2)  Subsection (1) does not limit the generality of Division 3 of Part 3 of Chapter 3 of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997.
(2A)  The Tribunal may confirm the order for restitution the subject of the review proceedings if the Tribunal confirms the decision to make the order (with or without variations).
(3)  The Tribunal may confirm an order for restitution made under section 59 if satisfied that the applicant for the administrative review has been convicted of a relevant offence. If the Tribunal is not so satisfied, it must reverse the original decision.
(4)  The Tribunal may confirm an order for restitution made under section 60 if satisfied that—
(a)  a person against whom a provisional order has been made has disposed of property as part of a scheme for the purpose of avoiding a liability (whether actual or potential) under this Division, and
(b)  the applicant was a party to the scheme and obtained property under the scheme without giving sufficient consideration.
If the Tribunal is not so satisfied, it must reverse the original decision.
s 67: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [16]–[18]; 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [12] [20] [21].
68   Arrangements for reduction of amount payable
(1)  The Commissioner and a defendant may enter into an arrangement with respect to payment under an order for restitution (whether or not it is a confirmed order) that enables the defendant to satisfy the order by paying a reduced amount.
(2)    (Repealed)
(3)  For the purpose of enabling the Commissioner and the defendant to come to such an arrangement, the Tribunal may adjourn review proceedings for such period as it considers appropriate.
(4)  If the defendant does not comply with such an arrangement, review proceedings may be recommenced on application by the Commissioner for the purposes of confirming the order for restitution for the total amount payable under the order.
(5)  The Commissioner cannot enter into an arrangement under this section if the matter has been referred to the Fines Commissioner for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996.
s 68: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [10] [22]–[24].
69   Provisions relating to orders for restitution confirmed by Tribunal
(1)  The Tribunal may reduce the amount to be paid under an order for restitution that it confirms having regard to—
(a)  the financial means of the defendant, and
(b)  such other matters as are, in the opinion of the Tribunal, relevant to the determination.
(2), (3)    (Repealed)
(4)  If the Tribunal decides under subsection (1) to reduce the amount payable by a defendant under an order made against 2 or more defendants, the Tribunal may confirm the order subject to the liability of the defendant concerned being limited under the order to an amount specified in the order.
s 69: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [12] [25].
70   Amount payable
(1)  The maximum amount that may be ordered to be paid under an order for restitution (whether made against one or more defendants) is the amount that has been paid to the victim under an approval for the giving of financial support or making of a recognition payment to which the order relates.
(2)  If an order for restitution is made against 2 or more defendants in respect of the same approval for the giving of financial support or making of a recognition payment, each of the defendants is jointly and severally liable under the order.
s 70: Rep 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [19]. Ins 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [26].
70A   Effect of confirmation of order and due date for payment
(1)  If an order for restitution is confirmed by the Commissioner or the Tribunal, the amount payable under the order by the person or persons against whom the order is made is a debt payable to the Commissioner.
(2)  The due date for the amount is the due date for payment specified in a debt notice served on the person.
s 70A: Ins 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [26].
70B   Debt notice to be served
(1)  The Commissioner may, by notice served on a person against whom a confirmed order has been made (a debt notice), require the person to pay the amount payable by the person under the order.
(2)  The notice is to specify the amount payable, the due date for payment and the person to whom it is to be paid.
(3)  The due date specified must not be less than 28 days after the notice is served on the person.
(4)  A debt notice must inform the person that, if the amount payable is not paid by the due date—
(a)  the matter may be referred to the Fines Commissioner and enforcement action for recovery of the amount may be taken under the Fines Act 1996, and
(b)  additional enforcement costs may become payable under that Act if that enforcement action is taken.
s 70B: Ins 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [26].
71   Orders for restitution to be subject to administrative review of relevant approvals of victims support
(1)  A confirmed order does not have any effect—
(a)  until the period within which an application may be made to the Tribunal for an administrative review of the decision to approve the making of a recognition payment from which it arises, or to which it relates, has expired, or
(b)  if such an application is duly made within that period, until the application is finally determined.
(2)  If the approval of the making of a recognition payment to which such an application relates is set aside or varied as a result of the an administrative review, the order for restitution ceases to have effect.
(3)  In the event that the decision is varied, a new order for restitution may be made in accordance with this Division as if the original order had not been made.
(4)  If the Commissioner refers an order for restitution to the Fines Commissioner for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996, the Commissioner must advise the Fines Commissioner—
(a)  if an application is made for administrative review of the decision to approve the making of a recognition payment from which the order arises, and
(b)  of the outcome of the application.
s 71: Am 2013 No 95, Sch 2.149 [20]; 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [27]–[29].
72   Enforcement of order for restitution
(1)  The Commissioner has, and is to exercise, the functions of a registrar of a court under Division 3 of Part 2 of the Fines Act 1996 (as they apply under Part 7A of that Act) in relation to an amount payable under an order for restitution.
Note—
Under the Fines Act 1996, a restitution amount is taken to be a fine and is to be referred to the Fines Commissioner for enforcement under that Act if it is not paid by the due date or if the person required to pay the restitution amount seeks a time to pay order in respect of the amount.
(2)  If the Commissioner confirms an order for restitution following an objection by the defendant, the Commissioner is not to refer the matter to the Fines Commissioner for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996
(a)  before the period in which an application may be made to the Tribunal by the defendant for an administrative review of the decision to make the order has expired, or
(b)  if the defendant has applied to the Tribunal for an administrative review of the decision to make the order, until the application is finally determined.
(3)  If a matter is referred to the Fines Commissioner for the making of a court fine enforcement order, the Commissioner must provide the Fines Commissioner with any information about the order for restitution that the Fines Commissioner reasonably requires to monitor the status of the order.
s 72: Subst 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [30].
73   Joint and several liability
(1)  If 2 or more persons are jointly and severally liable for the payment of an amount payable under a confirmed order—
(a)  a debt notice may be served on any of those persons, and
(b)  in each case, the matter may be referred to the Fines Commissioner for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996 against the person on whom the debt notice was served.
(2)  Accordingly, more than one referral, and more than one court fine enforcement order, may be made in respect of the amount payable.
(3)  The total amount that may be recovered under the order (excluding enforcement costs) is not to exceed the total amount payable under the order for restitution.
(4)  If 2 or more persons are jointly and severally liable for payment of the amount payable under an order for restitution, a person who pays an amount in accordance with the liability imposed by this Part has such rights of contribution or indemnity from the other person or persons as are just.
s 73: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [3]. Subst 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [30].
74   Effect of order for restitution on subsequent civil proceedings
(1)  This section applies to civil proceedings in respect of an injury or loss sustained by a person to whom an approval for the giving of victims support has been given under Part 4 (being an approval in respect of which an order for restitution has been made) on the basis of the same facts as those on which the civil proceedings are based.
(2)  An order for restitution does not affect a person’s right to commence or maintain civil proceedings, and damages in the civil proceedings must be assessed without regard to the order.
(3)  However, the right of the State, under section 55, to commence or maintain civil proceedings is extinguished by a confirmed order.
(4)  Subsection (3) does not revive the right of any other person to commence or maintain civil proceedings to the extent to which that right was previously subrogated to the State under section 55.
(5)  This section does not limit the operation of section 55 or 102.
s 74: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [31].
75   Access to information about whereabouts of defendant
Police officers, Transport for NSW and other Government agencies are authorised to provide the Commissioner with information about the address of a defendant for the purpose of serving an order for restitution on the defendant or any other notice required under this Part.
s 75: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [32]; 2020 No 30, Sch 4.116.
76, 77   (Repealed)
s 76: Rep 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [33].
s 77: Rep 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [33].
Division 3 Restraining orders and orders relating to the disposition of property by offenders
78   Objects
The objects of this Division are—
(a)  to enable restraining orders to be obtained to prevent persons who may be, or are, subject to restitution orders from disposing of property so as to avoid paying restitution, and
(b)  to enable orders to be made setting aside certain transactions contravening restraining orders or entered into for the purpose of avoiding payment of restitution.
79   Application of Division
This Division applies where—
(a)  a person has been charged with an offence in relation to which an act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred resulting in an injury to a victim for which financial support may be paid or a recognition payment made, or
(b)  a person has been convicted of an offence in relation to which any such act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred, or
(c)  a person was a party to a scheme to avoid a liability (whether actual or potential) under Division 2 and obtained property under that scheme without giving sufficient consideration.
s 79: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[19].
80   Interpretation
(1)  In this Division—
appropriate officer means the Commissioner, the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Commissioner of Police or any other person, or a person of a class, prescribed by the regulations for the purposes of this definition.
restraining order—see section 81.
the defendant means a person referred to in section 79.
(2)  In this Division, a reference to a person being charged with an offence is a reference to a person—
(a)  in respect of whom a charge sheet has been completed by a police officer where proceedings for an offence are to be commenced against the person, or
(b)  against whom proceedings for an offence have been commenced.
81   Nature of restraining order
A restraining order is an order of the Supreme Court directing that any property of the defendant, or under the effective control of the defendant, is not to be disposed of, or otherwise dealt with, by the defendant or by any other person, except in such manner and in such circumstances (if any) as are specified in the order.
82   Application for restraining order
(1)  An appropriate officer may apply, ex parte, to the Supreme Court for a restraining order in relation to property of the defendant or property under the effective control of the defendant.
(2)  On an application under this section—
(a)  the Supreme Court may, if it thinks fit, require the person making the application to give notice of the application to a person who the Court has reason to believe has an interest in the property or part of the property, and
(b)  a person to whom the Court requires notice to be given under paragraph (a) is entitled to appear and to adduce evidence at the hearing of the application.
83   Making of restraining order
(1)  On an application under section 82 relating to a defendant charged with, or convicted of, an offence, the Supreme Court may make a restraining order in relation to the defendant’s property or property under the effective control of the defendant, if it is satisfied (on the information contained in or accompanying the application) that—
(a)  the defendant has been charged with an offence in relation to which an act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred resulting in an injury to a victim for which financial support may be paid, or a recognition payment may be made, or has been convicted of an offence in relation to which any such act of violence or act of modern slavery occurred, and
(b)  amounts of victims support are or are likely to be payable, and
(c)  it is appropriate to make the order in the circumstances of the case.
(2)  On an application under section 82 relating to a defendant who was a party to a scheme to avoid a liability (whether actual or potential) under Division 2, the Supreme Court may make a restraining order in relation to the defendant’s property or property under the control of the defendant, if it is satisfied (on the information contained in or accompanying the application) that—
(a)  the defendant was a party to a scheme to avoid a liability (whether actual or potential) under Division 2 and obtained property under that scheme without giving sufficient consideration, and
(b)  an order has been, or may be, made against the defendant under section 60, and
(c)  it is appropriate to make the restraining order in the circumstances of the case.
(3)  Without limiting this section, in considering whether to make a restraining order, the Supreme Court is to consider the effect of any proposed order on the defendant’s ability to pay his or her reasonable living expenses or those of his or her dependants or on the defendant’s ability to meet legal expenses.
(4)  The Supreme Court may not make a restraining order in relation to property if the property is affected by a restraining order in force under the Criminal Assets Recovery Act 1990 or the Confiscation of Proceeds of Crime Act 1989.
(5)  A restraining order may be made in relation to property under the Criminal Assets Recovery Act 1990 or the Confiscation of Proceeds of Crime Act 1989 even though the property is subject to a restraining order under this Act.
s 83: Am 2018 No 30, Sch 5.7[20].
84   Undertakings
The Supreme Court may refuse to make a restraining order if the person making the application refuses or fails to give to the Court such undertakings as the Court considers appropriate with respect to the payment of damages or costs, or both, in relation to the making or operation of the order.
85   Ancillary orders
(1)  If the Supreme Court makes a restraining order, it may make any ancillary orders that it considers appropriate.
(2)  Without limiting subsection (1), ancillary orders may include any one or more of the following—
(a)  an order for the examination on oath of—
(i)  the defendant, or
(ii)  another person,
before the Supreme Court, or an officer of the Court prescribed by rules of court, concerning the affairs of the defendant, including the nature and location of any property of the defendant,
(b)  an order varying the restraining order in respect of the property to which it relates,
(c)  an order varying any conditions to which the restraining order was subject.
(3)  An ancillary order may be made on application by the following—
(a)  the applicant for the restraining order,
(b)  the defendant,
(c)  with the leave of the Supreme Court, any other person.
(4)  Ancillary orders may be made when or at any time after the restraining order is made. An ancillary order referred to in subsection (2) (a) may be made in advance of the restraining order.
(5)  A person being examined under this section is not excused from answering a question on the ground that—
(a)  the answer to the question might tend to incriminate the person or make the person liable to a forfeiture or penalty, or
(b)  the answer would disclose information that is the subject of legal professional privilege.
(6)  A statement or disclosure made by the person in answer to a question put in the course of an examination under this section, and any information, document or thing obtained as a direct or indirect consequence of the statement or disclosure, is not admissible against the person in any civil or criminal proceedings, except proceedings—
(a)  in respect of the false or misleading nature of a statement or disclosure made under this Act, or
(b)  on an application under this Act, or
(c)  ancillary to an application under this Act, or
(d)  for enforcement of a restitution order.
86   Registration of restraining orders and lodging of caveats
(1)  If a restraining order applies to property of a particular kind and the provisions of any law of the State provide for the registration of title to, or charges over, property of that kind, the authority responsible for administering the provisions is required, on application by any person, to record the particulars of the order in the register kept under those provisions.
(2)  If the particulars of a restraining order are so recorded, a person who subsequently deals with the property is, for the purposes of section 89, taken to have notice of the restraining order.
(3)  If a restraining order applies to land under the provisions of the Real Property Act 1900, a caveat may be lodged under that Act in relation to the order.
87   Court may revoke restraining order
(1)  The Supreme Court may revoke a restraining order on application by the person in relation to whose property it was made.
(2)  The Supreme Court may refuse to revoke the order if the person does not—
(a)  give security satisfactory to the Court for the payment of any amount for which the person may become liable under Division 2 as a result of the person’s commission of an act of violence, or
(b)  give undertakings satisfactory to the Court concerning the person’s property.
(3)  The Supreme Court may revoke a restraining order on application by an appropriate officer.
(4)  This section does not limit the discretion of the Supreme Court to revoke or refuse to revoke a restraining order.
88   Time when restraining order ceases to be in force
(1)  If, after a restraining order is made in reliance on the charging of a person with an offence—
(a)  the charge is withdrawn and the person is not charged with a related offence by the time of the withdrawal—the restraining order ceases to be in force when the charge is withdrawn, or
(b)  the person is acquitted of the charge and the person is not charged with a related offence by the time of the acquittal—the restraining order ceases to be in force when the acquittal occurs.
(2)  If a restraining order is made in reliance on the charging of a person with (or the conviction of a person of) an offence, the restraining order ceases to be in force 2 years after it is made.
(3)  If a restraining order is made against a person referred to in section 79 (c), the restraining order ceases to be in force 2 years after it is made.
(4)  The Supreme Court may, on the application of an appropriate officer, extend for a specified period the period for which a restraining order is in force under this section.
89   Avoidance of liabilities
(1)  A person who knowingly contravenes a restraining order by disposing of, or otherwise dealing with, property that is subject to the order is guilty of an offence.
Maximum penalty—A fine equivalent to the value of the property (as determined by the court) or imprisonment for 2 years, or both.
(2)  A person who knowingly disposes of, or otherwise deals with, property as part of a scheme for the purpose of avoiding a liability under Division 2 (whether actual or potential) is guilty of an offence.
Maximum penalty—A fine equivalent to the value of the property (as determined by the court) or imprisonment for 2 years, or both.
90   Orders setting aside dispositions of property
(1) Application for order setting aside disposition of or dealing with property If—
(a)  a restraining order is made or may be sought against property, and
(b)  the property is disposed of, or otherwise dealt with—
(i)  in contravention of the restraining order, or
(ii)  before a restraining order is obtained as part of a scheme for the purpose of avoiding a liability under Division 2 (whether actual or potential), and
(c)  the disposition or dealing was either not for sufficient consideration or not in favour of a person who acted in good faith,
an appropriate officer may apply to the Supreme Court for an order that the disposition of or dealing with the property be set aside.
(2) Order setting aside disposition or dealing If an application is made under this section and the Supreme Court is satisfied as to the matters set out in subsection (1), the Court may make an order—
(a)  setting aside the disposition or dealing as from the day on which the disposition or dealing took place or as from the day of the order under this subsection, and
(b)  (if appropriate) declaring the respective rights of any persons who acquired interests in the property on or after the day on which the disposition or dealing took place and before the day of the order.
(3) Protection of successors in title This section does not affect the rights of a person who acquired property from a person in good faith and by giving consideration that was at least as valuable as the market value of the property at the time of its acquisition.
Part 6 Compensation awarded by court
Division 1 Preliminary
91   Object of Part
The object of this Part is to give effect to an alternative scheme under which a court may order the person it finds guilty of a crime to pay compensation to any victim of the crime.
92   Definitions
In this Part—
aggrieved person
(a)  in relation to an injury—has the meaning it has in section 93, and
(b)  in relation to loss—has the meaning it has in section 96.
direction for compensation
(a)  for an injury—means a direction for compensation under section 94, and
(b)  for loss—means a direction for compensation under section 97.
Division 2 Compensation for injury
93   Definition
In this Division—
aggrieved person, in relation to an offence—
(a)  other than an offence in respect of the death of a person—means a person who has sustained injury through or by reason of—
(i)  an offence for which the offender has been convicted, or
(ii)  an offence taken into account (under Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999) when sentence was passed on the offender for that offence, or
(b)  in respect of the death of a person—means a member of the immediate family of the person.
94   Directions for compensation for injury
(1)  A court that convicts a person of an offence may (on the conviction or at any time afterwards), by notice given to the offender, direct that a sum not exceeding $50,000 be paid out of the property of the offender to any—
(a)  aggrieved person, or
(b)  aggrieved persons in such proportions as may be specified in the direction,
by way of compensation for any injury sustained through, or by reason of, the offence or any other offence taken into account (under Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999) when sentence was passed on the offender for that offence.
(2)  A direction for compensation may be given by a court on its own initiative or on application made to it by or on behalf of an aggrieved person.
95   Restrictions on court’s power to give directions for compensation for injury
(1)  A direction for compensation under this Division must not be given in respect of the conviction of a person for an offence if the aggregate of the sum specified in the direction and of all sums specified in a direction for compensation previously given under this Division—
(a)  on the conviction of any other person for that offence, or
(b)  on the conviction of that or any other person for a related offence,
exceeds $50,000.
(2)  A direction for compensation under this Division for which financial support is payable under Part 4 must not be given if an approval for the giving of such financial support in respect of the injury has been made under that Part to or for the benefit of the aggrieved person.
(3)  For the purposes of this section, an offence is related to another offence if—
(a)  both of the offences were committed against the same person, and
(b)  in the opinion of the court, both of the offences were committed at approximately the same time or were, for any other reason, related to each other.
However, an offence is not related to any earlier offence in respect of which a direction for compensation has been given if it is committed after the direction was given.
(4)  In this section, a reference to a direction for compensation previously given under this Division includes a reference to a direction for compensation previously given under the following—
(a)  Part 6 of the Victims Compensation Act 1987,
(c)  section 437 or 554 (3) of the Crimes Act 1900.
Division 3 Compensation for loss
96   Definitions
In this Division—
aggrieved person, in relation to an offence, means a person who has sustained loss through or by reason of—
(a)  an offence for which the offender has been convicted, or
(b)  a further offence that a court has taken into account under Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 in imposing a penalty for an offence for which the offender has been convicted.
court means the Supreme Court, the Court of Criminal Appeal, the District Court or the Local Court.
97   Directions for compensation for loss
(1)  A court that convicts a person of an offence may (on the conviction or at any time afterwards), by notice given to the offender, direct that a specified sum be paid out of the property of the offender to any—
(a)  aggrieved person, or
(b)  aggrieved persons in such proportions as may be specified in the direction,
by way of compensation for any loss sustained through, or by reason of, the offence or, if applicable, any further offence that the court has taken into account under Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 in imposing a penalty for an offence for which the offender has been convicted.
(2)  A direction for compensation may be given by a court on its own initiative or on an application made to it by or on behalf of the aggrieved person.
98   Restrictions on court’s power to give directions for compensation for loss
A court may not give a direction for compensation—
(a)  for economic loss for which financial support is payable under this Act or compensation is payable under Division 2, or
(b)  for an amount in excess of the maximum amount that, in its civil jurisdiction, the court is empowered to award in proceedings for the recovery of a debt.
Division 4 General
99   Factors to be taken into consideration
In determining whether or not to give a direction for compensation and in determining the sum to be paid under such a direction, the court must have regard to the following—
(a)  any behaviour (including past criminal activity), attitude or disposition of the aggrieved person which directly or indirectly contributed to the injury or loss sustained by the aggrieved person,
(b)  any amount which has been paid to the aggrieved person or which the aggrieved person is entitled to be paid by way of damages awarded in civil proceedings in respect of substantially the same facts as those on which the offender was convicted,
(c)  such other matters as it considers relevant.
s 99: Am 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [15].
100   Payment of sum directed
Subject to section 9 of the Criminal Appeal Act 1912 and to the provisions of the Criminal Procedure Act 1986, any sum directed to be paid by an offender to an aggrieved person, under a direction for compensation, must be paid immediately, or within such period (if any) as is specified in the direction, to the registrar of the court for payment to the aggrieved person.
101   Enforcement of directions for compensation
(1)  If a court gives a direction for compensation and the whole or any part of the amount specified in the direction is not paid in accordance with the direction, the registrar of the court must, on the application of the aggrieved person, issue to the aggrieved person a certificate that—
(a)  identifies the direction, and
(b)  specifies the name and address of the offender, and
(c)  specifies the amount required by the direction to be paid which has not, as at the date of the certificate, been paid to the registrar.
(2)  The registrar must not subsequently accept any payment from the offender in respect of the direction for compensation identified in a certificate issued under this section.
(3)  An aggrieved person may file such a certificate in the registry of a court having jurisdiction to order payment of the amount specified in the certificate, and the registrar of that court must immediately enter judgment in favour of the aggrieved person against the offender specified in the certificate for—
(a)  the amount specified in the certificate as having not been paid, and
(b)  any fees payable to the registrar in respect of the filing of the certificate.
(4)  A direction for compensation may only be enforced in accordance with this section and any amount not paid is not payable from the Fund or any other public money.
s 101: Am 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [16].
102   Effect of directions for compensation on subsequent civil proceedings
(1)  This section applies to civil proceedings commenced or maintained in respect of an injury or loss sustained by a person in respect of whom a direction for compensation has been given on the basis of the same facts as those on which the civil proceedings are based.
(2)  A direction for compensation does not affect a person’s right to commence or maintain civil proceedings, and damages in the civil proceedings must be assessed without regard to the direction.
(3)  The judgment of the court in which the civil proceedings are determined—
(a)  must not be entered in respect of so much of the amount of damages assessed by the court as is equivalent to the sum of the amounts that have been paid under the direction for compensation, and
(b)  must not be enforced, except with the leave of the court, in respect of so much of the amount of damages assessed by the court as is equivalent to the sum of the amounts that have not been paid under the direction for compensation.
(4)  This section does not limit the operation of section 55 or 74.
103   Directions for compensation not appealable on certain grounds
An appeal does not lie against a direction for compensation merely because, in civil proceedings arising from substantially the same facts as those on which the offender was convicted, the aggrieved person is awarded a lesser amount in damages than the amount of compensation required to be paid by the direction.
Part 7 Victims support levies
104   Object of Part
The object of this Part is to impose a levy on persons found guilty of crimes for the purpose of funding the Scheme.
105   Application of Part
(1)  This Part applies to all offences (other than any offences of a class referred to in subsection (2) or prescribed by the regulations) that are dealt with by—
(a)  the Supreme Court, or
(b)  the District Court, or
(c)  the Drug Court, or
(d)  the Local Court, or
(e)  the Land and Environment Court, or
(f)    (Repealed)
(g)  the Children’s Court, or
(h)  any other court prescribed by the regulations.
(2)  This Part does not apply to offences relating to the following—
(a)  engaging in offensive conduct,
(b)  the use of offensive language,
(c)  travelling on public transport without paying the fare or without a ticket,
(d)  the parking or standing of a vehicle.
(3)  This Part does not apply to an offence merely because it is taken into account (as referred to in Division 3 of Part 3 of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999) on the sentence of a person in respect of some other offence, whether or not that other offence is an offence to which this Part applies.
(4)  In this Part, conviction does not include an order made under section 10 (1) (a) of the Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Act 1999 in relation to an offence that is not punishable by imprisonment (whether or not it is also punishable by some other penalty).
s 105: Am 2016 No 48, Sch 2.36.
106   Imposition of victims support levy
(1)  A person who is convicted of an offence to which this Part applies is, by virtue of the conviction, liable to pay to the State a levy of—
(a)  $156, if the person is convicted on indictment or pursuant to a committal under section 97 of the Criminal Procedure Act 1986, or
(b)  $69, if the person is convicted otherwise than as referred to in paragraph (a).
(2)  Such a levy is in addition to, and does not form part of, any pecuniary penalty or order for payment of compensation imposed in respect of the same offence.
(3)  A person who is under the age of 18 years is not liable to pay such a levy if the court by which the person is convicted directs, whether when it convicts the person or at any time afterwards, that the person is exempt from liability to pay the levy.
(4)  Any money paid to the State in respect of an offence to which this Part applies is to be applied towards the discharge of such a levy before it is applied to the discharge of any pecuniary penalty or order for payment of compensation imposed in respect of the same offence.
s 106: Am 2017 No 55, Sch 3.9.
107   CPI adjustments of victims support levy
(1)  Starting at the end of the 2012–2013 financial year, each of the amounts of the levy payable under section 106 (1) is to be adjusted as provided by this section at the end of each financial year (the current financial year) to provide a new amount for the next financial year. The new amount applies for the next financial year and replaces the amount that applied for the current financial year.
(2)  The new amount for a financial year is to be calculated in accordance with the following formula—
 
where—
A is the new amount being calculated.
L is the amount of the levy for the current financial year.
B is the Sydney CPI number for March in the current financial year.
C is the Sydney CPI number for March in the financial year before the current financial year.
(3)  Before the end of each financial year (starting with the 2012–2013 financial year), the Minister is to publish a notice on the NSW legislation website of the amounts that are to apply for the purposes of section 106 for the next financial year. Failure to publish the notice or late publication of the notice does not affect the validity of an adjustment under this section.
Editorial note—
For the latest notice under this subsection, see the Victims Rights and Support (Victims Support Levy) Notice 2021.
(4)  If the amount calculated pursuant to an adjustment under this section as the new amount for a financial year is not a whole number of dollars, the amount is to be rounded up to the nearest whole dollar.
(5)  If an adjustment under this section would result in the new amount for the next financial year being less than the amount for the current financial year, the new amount for the next financial year is to be the same as the amount for the current financial year.
(6)  The new amount for a financial year is to be adjusted in accordance with the regulations if the Australian Statistician—
(a)  stops issuing Sydney CPI numbers, or
(b)  fails to issue a relevant Sydney CPI number before the start of the financial year for which the new amount is required to be calculated.
(7)  It is to be presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, that any amounts specified in a notice published under this section for a particular financial year are correct.
(8)  In this section—
financial year means a year starting on 1 July.
Sydney CPI number means the Consumer Price Index (All Groups Index) for Sydney issued by the Australian Statistician.
108   Effect of appeal proceedings
(1)  The commencement of any proceedings by way of appeal against, or review of, a conviction or sentence in respect of which a victims support levy has been imposed on a person under section 106 stays the liability of the person to pay the levy.
(2)  The setting aside of any such conviction annuls that liability.
(3)  The dismissal of any such proceedings removes the stay of liability.
Part 8 Victims Advisory Board
109   Establishment of Victims Advisory Board
There is established by this Act a Victims Advisory Board.
110   Membership and procedure of Victims Advisory Board
The Victims Advisory Board is to consist of the Commissioner (who is to be the Chairperson of the Board) and not more than 11 other members appointed by the Minister, including—
(a)  6 members representing the general community, and
(b)  a member representing the NSW Police Force, and
(c)  a member representing the Department of Justice, and
(d)  members representing other relevant Government agencies.
Note—
Schedule 1 contains provisions with respect to the membership and procedure of the Board.
s 110: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [5].
111   Functions of Victims Advisory Board
(1)  The Victims Advisory Board has the following functions—
(a)  to advise the Minister on policies and administrative arrangements relating to support services and assisting victims of crime,
(b)  to consult victims of crime, community victims support groups and Government agencies on issues and policies concerning victims of crime,
(c)  to promote legislative, administrative or other reforms to meet the needs of victims of crime.
(2)  Any advice given to the Minister may be given either at the request of the Minister or without any such request.
Part 9 Miscellaneous
112   Act to bind Crown
This Act binds the Crown in right of New South Wales and, in so far as the legislative power of the Parliament of New South Wales permits, the Crown in all its other capacities.
112A   Provision of personal information to victims of crime and family victims
(1)  A victims rights agency is not required to comply with section 9, 10, 17, 18 or 19 of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 if compliance by the agency would prevent—
(a)  the disclosure of information to a victim of crime or a family victim to which the victim is entitled under the Charter of Victims Rights (or the collection, use or disclosure of information that is incidental to that purpose), or
(b)  the disclosure of information that is reasonably necessary to inform a victim of crime or a family victim about the general location or movements of a serious offender of whom they were the victim.
(2)  However, nothing in subsection (1) requires a victims rights agency to disclose personal information to a victim of crime or a family victim if the agency is prohibited from doing so by or under this or any other Act or law.
(2A)  The personal information that may be provided by a victims rights agency to a victim of crime in accordance with subsection (1) may, if the victim is a child under the age of 18 years or lacks the capacity to understand the nature of the information, be disclosed by the agency to a parent or guardian of the victim.
(3)  In this section—
personal information has the same meaning as in the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998.
serious offender means a person who has been convicted of an indictable offence that is punishable by imprisonment for life or for a term of 5 years or more.
victims rights agency means any of the following government sector agencies—
(a)  the Department of Family and Community Services,
(b)  the Department of Justice,
(c)  the Department of Premier and Cabinet,
(d)  a local health district or statutory health corporation within the meaning of the Health Services Act 1997,
(e)  the Mental Health Review Tribunal,
(f)  the NSW Police Force,
(g)  the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.
s 112A: Ins 2015 No 69, Sch 2.3. Am 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [17].
113   Inadmissibility and use of certain evidence in subsequent legal proceedings
(1)  Despite any rule of law to the contrary—
(a)  an application for victims support and any documents supporting the application (whether or not furnished when the application is lodged) or any documents furnished to, or prepared by or on behalf of, the Commissioner at any time in connection with the application, and
(b)  an application for statutory compensation or for payment for approved counselling services under the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996 and any documents supporting the application (whether or not furnished when the application is lodged) or any documents or transcript of evidence in a hearing of the application furnished to, or prepared by or on behalf of, the Tribunal at any time in connection with the application under that Act,
are not admissible as evidence in any legal proceedings (whether criminal or civil) other than criminal proceedings in which the applicant is the accused arising from substantially the same facts as those on which the application is based.
(2)  Subsection (1) does not prevent the admission of evidence—
(a)  against the applicant in criminal proceedings in which the applicant is the accused, or
(b)  in proceedings before the Tribunal to determine any issue arising under or in relation to the determination of an application of a kind referred to in subsection (1).
(2A)  However, if any medical report supporting an application for victims support—
(a)  is lodged with the Tribunal under section 58 of the Administrative Decisions Review Act 1997 in connection with review proceedings under Part 5 of this Act, or
(b)  is admitted as evidence in review proceedings under Part 5,
the report must not be disclosed or provided to the applicant in those proceedings.
(3)  A person cannot be required (whether by subpoena or any other procedure) to produce any application or document that is not admissible in evidence in legal proceedings under subsection (1) in, or in connection with, any such legal proceeding.
s 113: Am 2013 No 111, Sch 1.14 [1] [2]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [18].
114   Personal liability of Commissioner and others
A matter or thing done (or omitted to be done) by the Commissioner, any member of staff employed for the purposes of this Act or a person acting under the direction of the Commissioner does not, if the matter or thing was done (or omitted to be done) in good faith for the purpose of exercising a function under this Act, subject the Commissioner, the member of staff or the person so acting personally to any action, liability, claim or demand.
115   Proceedings for offences
(1)  Proceedings for an offence under this Act (other than section 89) or the regulations may be dealt with summarily before the Local Court.
(2)  Proceedings for an offence under section 89 may be dealt with summarily before—
(a)  the Local Court, or
(b)  the Supreme Court in its summary jurisdiction.
(3)  The maximum fine the Local Court may impose for an offence in proceedings before it under section 89 is $10,000.
116   Service of documents
(1)  A document that is authorised or required by this Act or the regulations to be served on any person may be served by—
(a)  in the case of a natural person—
(i)  delivering it to the person personally, or
(ii)  sending it by post to the address specified by the person for the giving or service of documents or, if no such address is specified, the residential or business address of the person last known to the person giving or serving the document, or
(iii)  sending it by facsimile transmission to the facsimile number of the person or by email to the email address of the person, or
(b)  in the case of a body corporate—
(i)  leaving it with a person apparently of or above the age of 16 years at, or by sending it by post to, the head office, a registered office or a principal office of the body corporate or to an address specified by the body corporate for the giving or service of documents, or
(ii)  sending it by facsimile transmission to the facsimile number of the body corporate or by email to the email address of the body corporate.
(2)  Nothing in this section affects the operation of any provision of a law or of the rules of a court authorising a document to be served on a person in any other manner.
117   Regulations
(1)  The Governor may make regulations, not inconsistent with this Act, for or with respect to any matter that by this Act is required or permitted to be prescribed or that is necessary or convenient to be prescribed for carrying out or giving effect to this Act.
(2)  In particular, regulations may be made for or with respect to the establishment of panels of appropriately qualified persons for the purpose of recommending counsellors for approval by the Commissioner under Part 4.
(3)  A regulation may create an offence punishable by a penalty not exceeding 10 penalty units.
118   (Repealed)
s 118: Rep 1987 No 15, sec 30C.
119   Reviews of Act
(1)  The Minister is to undertake reviews of this Act to determine whether the policy objectives of the Act remain valid and whether the terms of the Act remain appropriate for securing those objectives.
(2)  The reviews are to be undertaken—
(a)  for the first review—as soon as possible after the period of 3 years from the date of assent to this Act, and
(b)  for subsequent reviews—at intervals of not less than 3 years and not more than 5 years.
(3)  A report on the outcome of each review is to be tabled in each House of Parliament within 12 months after the end of the review.
Schedule 1 Provisions relating to Victims Advisory Board
(Section 110)
1   Definitions
In this Schedule—
Board means the Victims Advisory Board.
member means a member of the Board, other than the Chairperson of the Board.
2   Terms of office of members
Subject to this Schedule, a member holds office for such period (not exceeding 3 years) as is specified in the member’s instrument of appointment, but is eligible (if otherwise qualified) for re-appointment.
3   Allowances of members
A member (other than a member who is employed by a Government agency) is entitled to be paid such allowances as the Minister may from time to time determine in respect of the member.
4   Deputies
(1)  The Minister may, from time to time, appoint a person to be the deputy of a member, and the Minister may revoke any such appointment.
(2)  In the absence of a member, the member’s deputy—
(a)  may, if available, act in the place of the member, and
(b)  while so acting, has all the functions of the member and is taken to be a member.
(3)  A person (other than a person employed by a Government agency) while acting in the place of a member is entitled to be paid such allowances as the Minister may from time to time determine in respect of the person.
5   Vacancy in office of member
(1)  The office of a member becomes vacant if the member—
(a)  dies, or
(b)  completes a term of office and is not re-appointed, or
(c)  resigns the office by instrument in writing addressed to the Minister, or
(d)  is removed from office by the Minister, or
(e)  is absent from 4 consecutive meetings of the Board of which reasonable notice has been given to the member personally or by post, except on leave granted by the Board or unless the member is excused by the Board for having been absent from those meetings, or
(f)  becomes bankrupt, applies to take the benefit of any law for the relief of bankrupt or insolvent debtors, compounds with his or her creditors or makes an assignment of his or her remuneration for their benefit, or
(g)  becomes a mentally incapacitated person, or
(h)  is convicted in New South Wales of an offence that is punishable by imprisonment for 12 months or more or is convicted elsewhere than in New South Wales of an offence that, if committed in New South Wales, would be an offence so punishable.
(2)  The Minister may remove a member from office at any time.
6   Filling of vacancy in office of member
If the office of any member becomes vacant, a person is, subject to this Act, to be appointed to fill the vacancy.
7   Effect of certain other Acts
(1)  The provisions of the Government Sector Employment Act 2013 relating to the employment of Public Service employees do not apply to a member.
(2)  If by or under any Act provision is made—
(a)  requiring a person who is the holder of a specified office to devote the whole of his or her time to the duties of that office, or
(b)  prohibiting the person from engaging in employment outside the duties of that office,
the provision does not operate to disqualify the person from holding that office and also the office of a member or from accepting and retaining any allowance payable to the person under this Act as a member.
8   General procedure
The procedure for the calling of meetings of the Board and for the conduct of those meetings is, subject to this Schedule and the regulations, to be determined by the Board.
9   Quorum
The quorum for a meeting of the Board is a majority of the members (including the Chairperson) for the time being.
10   Presiding member
(1)  The Chairperson (or, in the absence of the Chairperson, a member elected to chair the meeting by the members present) is to preside at a meeting of the Board.
(2)  The person presiding has a deliberative vote and, in the event of an equality of votes, has a second or casting vote.
11   Voting
A decision supported by a majority of the votes cast at a meeting of the Board at which a quorum is present is the decision of the Board.
12   First meeting
The Minister may call the first meeting of the Board in such manner as the Minister thinks fit.
sch 1: Am 2015 No 58, Sch 3.93 [7].
Schedule 2 Savings, transitional and other provisions
Part 1 General
1   Regulations
(1)  The regulations may contain provisions of a savings or transitional nature consequent on the enactment of this Act or any Act that amends this Act.
(2)  Any such provision may, if the regulations so provide, take effect from the date of assent to the Act concerned or a later date.
(3)  To the extent to which any such provision takes effect from a date that is earlier than the date of its publication on the NSW legislation website, the provision does not operate so as—
(a)  to affect, in a manner prejudicial to any person (other than the State or an authority of the State), the rights of that person existing before the date of its publication, or
(b)  to impose liabilities on any person (other than the State or an authority of the State) in respect of anything done or omitted to be done before the date of its publication.
(4)  Regulations under this clause may have effect despite any provision of Part 2.
Part 2 Provisions consequent on enactment of this Act
2   Interpretation
(1)  In this Part—
introduction day means the day the Bill for this Act was first introduced into Parliament.
statutory compensation means statutory compensation within the meaning of the repealed Act.
the repealed Act means the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996 as in force immediately before its repeal by this Act.
(2)  For the purposes of this Part, proceedings are not finally determined if—
(a)  any period for bringing an appeal as of right in respect of the proceedings has not expired (ignoring any period that may be available by way of extension of time to appeal), or
(b)  any appeal in respect of the proceedings is pending (whether or not it is an appeal brought as of right).
(1)  Schedule 4 sets out the terms of the Victims Rights and Support Regulation 2013.
(2)  On and from the commencement of this clause—
(a)  Schedule 4 is taken to be, and to have effect as, a regulation under this Act, and
(b)  the regulation set out in Schedule 4 is taken, for the purposes of section 10 of the Subordinate Legislation Act 1989, to have been published on the commencement of this clause, and
(c)  sections 39, 40 and 41 of the Interpretation Act 1987 do not apply to the regulation set out in Schedule 4 (but apply to any amendment or repeal of the regulation).
(3)  Schedule 4 is repealed on the day following the day on which this clause commences.
Note—
The continued effect of the regulation set out in Schedule 4 is unaffected by the repeal of Schedule 4. See section 30 of the Interpretation Act 1987.
4   Statutory compensation scheme closure
(1)  Statutory compensation is not payable after the introduction day unless an application for the statutory compensation was finally determined before that day.
(2)  Statutory compensation that would have been payable (less any deductions under section 19A of the repealed Act) from the Victims Compensation Fund pursuant to an application that was finally determined before the introduction day is payable (less such deductions) from the Victims Support Fund under this Act.
5   Applications for compensation under statutory compensation scheme
(1)  An application for statutory compensation that was lodged, but not finally determined, under the repealed Act before the introduction day is to be dealt with under this Act (subject to this clause) as if it were an application for victims support.
(2)  The applicant concerned is eligible for victims support under the Scheme comprising approved counselling services or a recognition payment, or both.
(3)  The applicant concerned is not eligible for victims support under the Scheme comprising financial assistance for immediate needs or financial assistance for economic loss. However, if the application would, if it had been made for victims support referred to in section 26 (1) (b) or (c) of this Act, have been duly lodged in accordance with this Act within the prescribed period, the applicant is eligible for a special grant of $5,000 payable from the Victims Support Fund.
(4)  In subclause (3)—
prescribed period means—
(a)  the period of 2 years after the act of violence in respect of which the application is made was committed (the relevant act of violence), or
(b)  if the victim concerned was a child when the relevant act of violence was committed—within 2 years after the child reaches 18 years of age.
(5)  Any application determined under subclause (1) is taken to have been determined as an application for victims support under this Act.
(6)  The amount determined to be payable to the applicant under this clause is to be reduced by the amount of any interim award of statutory compensation made to the applicant under section 33 of the repealed Act.
(7)  The applicant is not required to refund any part of an interim award of statutory compensation made to the applicant under section 33 of the repealed Act that is more than the amount determined to be payable under this clause.
6   No victims support payable under both repealed Act and this Act
Victims support is not payable under this Act to a primary victim, secondary victim or family victim of an act of violence if the victim has already been awarded compensation or assistance under the repealed Act.
7   Approved counselling services
Section 32 of this Act extends to any application for payment for approved counselling services that was made to the Director under the repealed Act before the commencement of that section, but does not affect any decision made under the repealed Act before that commencement.
8   Application of approved counselling scheme to previous acts of violence
Despite clause 7, Division 4 of Part 4 of this Act extends to a victim of an act of violence in respect of which an application for compensation has been made and dealt with under the repealed Act.
9   Continuation of Fund
The Victims Compensation Fund established by the repealed Act becomes, on the repeal of that Act, the Victims Support Fund established by this Act.
10   Victims Advisory Board
(1)  The Victims Advisory Board established by the Victims Rights Act 1996 (the old Board) as in force immediately before its repeal by this Act is taken to be the Victims Advisory Board established by this Act.
(2)  A person (other than the Chairperson) who, immediately before the commencement of this clause, held office as a member of the old Board is taken (subject to this Act) to be a member of the Victims Advisory Board established by this Act.
(3)  The person who, immediately before the commencement of this clause, was the Chairperson of the old Board ceases to hold that office on that commencement and is not entitled to any remuneration or compensation because of the loss of that office.
11   Previous acts of violence
Subject to this Act, this Act extends to an act of violence that occurred before the introduction day (other than an act of violence in respect of which an application for compensation has been made and dealt with under the repealed Act).
12   Former members of Victims Compensation Tribunal
(1)  The Victims Compensation Tribunal (as constituted under the repealed Act) is abolished on the commencement of this clause.
(2)  Each person who immediately before the commencement of this clause held office as a member of the Victims Compensation Tribunal—
(a)  ceases to hold office as such, and
(b)  is taken to have been appointed, for the remainder of the term of office for which the person was appointed as a member of the Victims Compensation Tribunal, as a judicial member of the Administrative Decisions Tribunal assigned to the Victims Support Division of that Tribunal.
(3)  A person who was appointed on a part-time basis as a member of the Victims Compensation Tribunal is taken, on the commencement of this clause, to have been appointed under subclause (2) (b) on a part-time basis.
(4)  The person who, immediately before the abolition of the Victims Compensation Tribunal, was the Chairperson of that Tribunal is taken, on the commencement of this clause, to be the Deputy President of the Victims Support Division of the Administrative Decisions Tribunal.
(5)  A person does not cease to be a Magistrate merely because of the abolition of the Victims Compensation Tribunal.
(6)  This clause does not prevent a person referred to in subclause (2) from being appointed, with the consent of the person, to a different or additional office of the Administrative Decisions Tribunal or from vacating office in accordance with the provisions of that Act.
13   Pending proceedings before the Victims Compensation Tribunal
(1)  If proceedings to determine an application for statutory compensation or to hear an objection to the making of a provisional order for restitution under Division 8 of Part 2 of the repealed Act were initiated or commenced before the Victims Compensation Tribunal but not finally determined before the abolition of that Tribunal, the proceedings are taken on that abolition to have been duly initiated or commenced before the Administrative Decisions Tribunal.
(2)  The proceedings are to be heard, subject to clause 12 and in accordance with any practice notes or directions of the President of the Administrative Decisions Tribunal, by the person or persons determining the matter before the abolition.
14   Pending appeals and objections to Victims Compensation Tribunal
(1)  This clause applies to proceedings before the Victims Compensation Tribunal on an appeal under section 36 of the repealed Act or hearing on an objection under Division 8 of Part 2 of that Act that have not been finally determined on the commencement of this clause.
(2)  The person or persons determining the matter the subject of the appeal or objection—
(a)  are (subject to any practice notes or directions of the President of the Administrative Decisions Tribunal) to continue on and from the commencement of this clause to determine the matter, sitting as the Administrative Decisions Tribunal, and
(b)  have and may exercise, while sitting as the Administrative Decisions Tribunal under this clause, all the functions that the Victims Compensation Tribunal had immediately before that commencement.
15   Pending District Court proceedings
(1)  This clause applies to proceedings before the District Court on an appeal under section 39 of the repealed Act that have not been finally determined by that Court on the commencement of this clause.
(2)  Proceedings to which this clause applies are to be determined as if this Act had not been enacted.
16   Recovery proceedings against offender for amount payable under statutory award of compensation
(1)  Part 5 of this Act applies to statutory awards of compensation made under Part 2 of the repealed Act that were not the subject of a provisional order for restitution under Division 8 of Part 2 of the repealed Act before its repeal in the same way as it applies to amounts paid under Part 4 of this Act.
(2)  A provisional order for restitution made in respect of a statutory award of compensation under Division 8 of Part 2 of the repealed Act before its repeal is (unless notice of objection to the order has been filed and proceedings on the notice have not been finally dealt with) taken on that repeal to have been made by the Commissioner under Part 5 of this Act and is to be dealt with accordingly.
(3)  A provisional order for restitution made in respect of a statutory award of compensation under Division 8 of Part 2 of the repealed Act before its repeal in relation to which a notice of objection has been filed but in respect of which no hearing under section 49 of the repealed Act has commenced is taken on that repeal to have been a provisional order in respect of which an objection has been lodged under section 62 of this Act and is to be dealt with accordingly.
(4)  If a hearing on a notice of objection has commenced but has not been finally dealt with under section 49 of the repealed Act, the matter is (subject to clause 14) to be heard as if Division 8 of Part 2 of the repealed Act were in force.
(5)  However, if a provisional order is confirmed in proceedings referred to in subclause (4), the provisions of Division 2 of Part 5 of this Act apply to any proceedings for recovery of an amount payable under the relevant order for restitution.
17   Compensation awarded by a court
(1)  Part 6 of this Act applies to persons convicted or found guilty of offences after the commencement of that Part even though the proceedings were commenced before that commencement.
(2)  A direction for the payment of compensation given under Part 4 of the repealed Act may be recovered as if it had been given under Part 6 of this Act.
18   Support levies
(1)  Part 7 of this Act applies to persons convicted or found guilty of offences after the commencement of that Part even though the proceedings were commenced before that commencement.
(2)  A compensation levy imposed by the operation of Part 5 of the repealed Act may be recovered as if it had been imposed as a victims support levy by Part 7 of this Act.
19   Legal rights not affected
(1)  Nothing in Part 2 of this Act gives rise to, or can be taken into account in, any civil cause of action.
(2)  Without limiting subclause (1), nothing in that Part—
(a)  operates to create in any person any legal rights not in existence before the enactment of Part 2 of the Victims Rights Act 1996, or
(b)  affects the validity, or provides grounds for review, of any judicial or administrative act or omission.
(3)  However, this clause does not prevent a contravention of Part 2 of this Act from being the subject of disciplinary proceedings against an official or a complaint to the Commissioner under section 10.
20   Costs and expenses
Part 4 of the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Rule 1997 as in force immediately before the commencement of this clause continues to apply for the purposes of determining costs and expenses payable with respect to proceedings for compensation under the repealed Act or for victims support under this Act until regulations or rules, as the case requires, are made under this Act or the Administrative Decisions Tribunal Act 1997 for that matter.
21   General savings
(1)  If anything done, initiated or commenced under an Act repealed by this Act before the commencement of this clause and still having effect or not completed immediately before that commencement could have been done, initiated or completed under this Act if it had been in force when the thing was done, initiated or commenced—
(a)  the thing done continues to have effect, or
(b)  the thing initiated or commenced may be completed as if it had been done, initiated or commenced under this Act.
(2)  This clause is subject to any express provision of this Act on the matter.
Part 3 Provisions consequent on enactment of Fines Amendment Act 2017
22   Definitions
In this Part—
amending Act means the Fines Amendment Act 2017.
existing order means—
(a)  an order for restitution arising from a provisional order that was confirmed by the Commissioner or Tribunal before the substitution of section 72 by the amending Act, or
(b)  an order for restitution within the meaning of the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996 (as in force before its repeal) that is in force.
23   Amendments apply to orders confirmed after commencement
(1)  The amendments made to this Act by the amending Act apply in respect of any order for restitution (within the meaning of Part 5 of this Act) that is confirmed by the Commissioner or the Tribunal after the substitution of section 72 by the amending Act.
(2)  An amendment does not affect the validity of any action taken before that substitution in respect of an existing order and, subject to this Part, this Act, as in force at the time the action was taken, continues to apply in respect of the existing order.
24   Extension of amendments to existing orders
(1)  The Commissioner may refer an existing order to the Commissioner of Fines Administration for the making of a court fine enforcement order under the Fines Act 1996 if—
(a)  the Commissioner serves a debt notice on the person against whom the order was made in accordance with section 70B, and
(b)  that amount is not paid by the due date.
(2)  If an amount is referred as provided for by this clause, Part 7A of the Fines Act 1996 extends to the amount payable under the existing order.
(3)  For that purpose, a reference in the Fines Act 1996 to an order for restitution under this Act is taken to include a reference to an existing order.
(4)  The following provisions have effect if an amount payable by a person under an existing order is referred to the Commissioner of Fines Administration for the making of a court fine enforcement order against the person—
(a)  the Commissioner cannot commence or maintain any proceedings under section 72 (as in force before its substitution by the amending Act) for the payment of the amount by the person,
(b)  any charge registered on land owned by the defendant under section 76 (as in force before its repeal by the amending Act) to secure payment of the amount is taken to be a charge duly registered under section 74 of the Fines Act 1996 as if the order for restitution were a court fine enforcement order,
(c)  any deductions being made under section 73 (as in force before its substitution by the amending Act) can continue to be made as if an attachment order had duly been made against the person under Part 7A of the Fines Act 1996.
(5)  This clause applies to an existing order only if, immediately before the order is referred to the Commissioner of Fines Administration, the order is enforceable under section 72 (as in force before its substitution by the amending Act).
Part 4 Provisions consequent on enactment of Victims Rights and Support Amendment (Statutory Review) Act 2018
25   Application of amendments
(1)  In this clause—
former Act means the Victims Support and Rehabilitation Act 1996 or the Act repealed by that Act.
(2)  Subject to this clause, an amendment made by Schedule 1 to the amending Act does not apply in relation to an application for victims support made before the commencement of the amendment.
(3)  Sections 43 (7) and 48 (2A) and (2B), as inserted by the amending Act, extend to an application for victims support made, but not determined, before the commencement of those provisions.
(4)  The amendments to sections 44 and 49 made by the amending Act extend to an application for victims support made, but not determined, before the commencement of those amendments.
(5)  The amendment to section 58 made by the amending Act extends to an order for restitution made under Part 5 of this Act or a former Act before the commencement of that amendment and that has not been determined by the Tribunal.
(6)  Section 113 (2A), as inserted by the amending Act, does not apply in relation to proceedings before the Tribunal that have commenced before the commencement of that provision.
(7)  This clause does not apply to the amendments made by the amending Act to this Schedule.
Part 5 Provision consequent on enactment of Crimes Legislation Amendment Act 2018
26   Application of amendments about eligibility for motor vehicle accidents
Section 25 (2B), as inserted by the Crimes Legislation Amendment Act 2018, does not apply to an application for victims support relating to an act of violence that occurred before the commencement of the subsection.
Part 6 Provision consequent on enactment of Victims Rights and Support Amendment (Motor Vehicles) Act 2018
27   Amendments do not apply to acts of violence that occurred before the amendments commenced
(1)  Section 25 (2A), as inserted by the amending Act, does not apply to an application for victims support relating to an act of violence that occurred before the commencement of the subsection.
(2)  In this clause—
28   Payment of financial support or recognition payment
(1)  This clause applies to a financial support or recognition payment made by the Commissioner before the commencement of this clause for the purposes of section 46 of this Act—
(a)  to a person under legal incapacity, or
(b)  to another person who received the payment for the benefit of the person under legal incapacity.
(2)  A payment to which this clause applies that would have been validly made if section 46 of this Act, as amended by the amending Act, had been in force when the payment was made is validated.
(3)  In this clause—
person under legal incapacity has the same meaning as in the Civil Procedure Act 2005.
sch 2: Am 2017 No 6, Sch 2 [34]; 2018 No 34, Sch 1 [19] [20]; 2018 No 83, Sch 2 [3]; 2018 No 86, Sch 1 [3]; 2020 No 31, Sch 2.7[2].
Schedules 3, 4 (Repealed)
sch 3: Rep 1987 No 15, sec 30C.
sch 4: Rep 2013 No 37, cl 3 (3) of Sch 2.